Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Global Summit on Herbals and Traditional Medicine Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Herbals Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anirban Sukul photo
Biography:

Anirban Sukul has completed his PhD from Visva-Bharati University and Research Associate-ship from same university. He is the Director of Sukul Institute of Homeopathic Research, Kolkata, India. He has published 22 papers in international journals and authored a book published by Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands. He is conferred the Junior Scientist Award, Life Time Achievement Award, Gold Medal Award (UK), Man of Excellence Award, etc. He is in Board of Editors in many reputed international journals published from London, USA. He is also a Member of Research Committee, LMHI, Germany.

Abstract:

Two pairs of rows of cowpea plants Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp, were grown in earthen pots, each row containing 10 plants. Plants in each pair were connected by polythene tubes filled in water, the ends being dipped into water of two beakers. In each beaker, a mature leaf was immersed. Plants in one row of a pair were given heat stress through hot water while the corresponding water connected row of the same pair remained unstressed. Plants in one row of the second pair treated with Cantharis 200C, a homeopathy potency, used for the treatment for burns. The corresponding water connected row of this pair remained untreated. Another single row of plants served as the unstressed and untreated control. After a fixed time leaves of all the plants were harvested and homogenized. Leaf proteins of the plants in each row were separated by Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC). Leaf protein profile of the heat stressed plants showed similarity with that of unstressed but water connected plants. Cantharis-treated plants and the corresponding untreated but water connected ones showed similarity in the leaf protein profile. Leaf protein profile of the control plants was different from that of the two groups. It appears that an external stimulus to a plant brings about a change in the water structure in the plant which is transmitted through the Global Molecular Network (GMN) of water connecting the two plants.

Conference Series Herbals Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sophida Sukprasert photo
Biography:

Sophida Sukprasert has completed her PhD in field of Biochemistry from Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Presently she is a Lecturer and Researcher at Division of Integrative Medicine, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University since 2013. She is interested in the herbal medicines which possess antidote and anti-diabetic properties.

Abstract:

The leaves and stems of Lysiphyllum strychnifolium (Craib) A. Schmitz (Fabaceae family) have been traditionally used in Thailand for detoxification and to treat pesticide poisoning in humans. To uncover novel uses of L. strychnifolium, the possible antiviral properties against avian influenza virus A, strain H5N1, were explored in this study. The ethanolic extracts of L. strychnifolium leaves and stems showed good inhibitory activities against H5N1 which have never been previously reported of this plant, while the inhibition derived from aqueous extracts was not observed. Thereafter, the anti-neuraminidase activities of ethanolic extracts were evaluated using fluorometric determination via a MUNANA-based enzyme inhibition assay. Both stems and leaves ethanolic extracts showed good inhibitory activities against neuraminidase of Influenza A H5N1 with IC50 value of 55.30 and 70.00 μg/mL, respectively. Moreover, anti-bacterial activities of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of L. strychnifolium leaves and stems were tested using the disc diffusion method. All extracts showed broad antibacterial activities against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains. Phytochemical constituents of all extracts were identified through Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and revealed some compounds such as Methyl-phydrozybenzoate; Mome inositol; n-Hexadecanoic acid; Tetradecanamide; (Z)-9-Octadecanamide; 1,2,3,- Benzenetriol; Methylparaben; 4-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone; n-Hexadecanoic acid; Ethyl hexadecanoate; Phytol; (Z)-9-Octadecanoic acid and Octadecanoic acid. This is the first report of neuraminidase inhibitor against Influenza A H5N1 and antibacterial activities derived from L. strychnifolium extracts. It could be suggested that this plant is an alternative source for treatment of influenza viruses and antibiotic agent.

Keynote Forum

Keynote: Program will be updated soon..
Conference Series Herbals Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker    photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Break:
  • Herbal Medicine| Traditional Medicine | Medicinal Plants | Homeopathy
Speaker

Chair

Anirban Sukul

Sukul Institute of Homeopathic Research, India

Speaker
Biography:

Russell Smart has completed his Fellowship of the Royal New Zealand, College of General Practitioners. He currently works at Middlemore Hospital and has an interest in traditional Maori medicine Rongoā; medicinal use of plants.

Abstract:

Kawawkawa is one of New Zealand’s most distinctive native plants lives up to this common dictum as an herbal pharmacopoeia with a wide range of health benefits. The plant is aromatic and is commonly known as the pepper tree. This presentation will depict the use of kawakawa in traditional and modern herbal medicine. It will explore the biochemical nature of the known pharmacologically active compounds to help explain the wide ranging medicinal uses of this small evergreen shrub-like tree with large heart-shaped leaves.

Speaker
Biography:

Anirban Sukul has completed his PhD from Visva-Bharati University and Research Associate-ship from same university. He is the Director of Sukul Institute of Homeopathic Research, Kolkata, India. He has published 22 papers in international journals and authored a book published by Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands. He is conferred the Junior Scientist Award, Life Time Achievement Award, Gold Medal Award (UK), Man of Excellence Award, etc. He is in Board of Editors in many reputed international journals published from London, USA. He is also a Member of Research Committee, LMHI, Germany.

Abstract:

Male adult albino mice were administered potentized Nux vomica 30C (Nux). The drug was mixed with distilled water at 0.05 ml/2 ml water and given at 0.05 ml. Control is blank ethanol solution. Ethanolic extract from the seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica was mixed with 90% ethanol 1:100 and sonicated for 30s at 20 KHz and further diluted and sonicated in 30 steps to produce Nux 30C. Six hours after treatment, mice were given 25% ethanol i.p. at 4 g/kg body weight. The duration of sleep time starting from the loss of righting reflex until its restoration was recorded. Sleep time duration with ethanol was recorded in four sessions for same group of mice with an interval of 10 days between sessions. Treatments: Session-1: Control solution, 2: Nux (oral), and 3: Nux (i.p.). Nux (oral) produced shortest sleep time as compared to other treatments which did not differ from each other significantly with respect to sleep time. In another experiment Nux 30C was prepared with distilled water and pure absolute ethanol by the above process of successive dilution and sonication. These two preparations together with Nux 30C, prepared with 90% ethanol, were tested on mice for their effect on alcohol-induced sleep time. Only Nux 30C prepared with 90% ethanol was effective in reducing the sleep time in mice. It is concluded that the solution structure of ethanol/water mixture carries the specificity of the Nux at ultra-high dilution. It is further concluded that the effect is mediated through oral receptors.

Speaker
Biography:

Nutda Sutthammikorn has completed her Bachelor’s degree from Mahidol University and Master's degree from Faculty of Medicine at Chiang Mai University. Presently she is pursuing PhD from Chiang Mai University and International Research from Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine.

Abstract:

Wound healing impairment in the diabetic foot ulcers is the most frequently recognized complication in diabetic patients. Therefore, there is a substantially unmet need to develop new interventions that are effective, cheap and with fewer side effect burdens. Gynura procumbens (GP) is commonly found in Southeast Asian countries. The leaves extract of GP are used in folk medicine for treatment of various ailments such as fever, rash, inflammation, kidney disease, migraine, rheumatism, cancer, viral infection, hypertension, hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemia. However, the effect of GP on the healing of diabetic wounds has not been reported. In this study we examined the effects of GP gel treatment on wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and found that GP treatment significantly promoted wound healing faster than solcoseryl jelly, which is usually used as a wound healing drug in diabetic patients. GP also promoted angiogenesis around the wound area, and significantly increased the skin expression of angiogenin, endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor ß1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in both normal and diabetic mice. Moreover, GP elevated the expression of various growth factors in human fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells and mast cells. Interestingly, GP promoted keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation and enhanced fibroblast, keratinocyte and mast cell migration. These findings suggest that GP may be used as a wound healing drug in diabetic ulcers.

Maryam Davodi Far

Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China

Title: Traditional Chinese Medicine and Its Application in Psychotherapy
Speaker
Biography:

Maryam is pursuing advanced studies at Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. She is a licensed psychotherapist. She holds a Doctorate in public administration with emphasis in healthcare administration from University of La Verne. She holds three master’s degrees from National University: Master of Arts in counseling psychology, in human behavior, and in healthcare administration. She was National University’s lead faculty member managing the public administration undergraduate and graduate programs. She was chief executive officer for a San Diego community clinic. Maryam is executive director and founder of the Cancer Coping Center. She has published articles in peer-reviewed journals and was keynote speaker at various international conferences.

Abstract:

Traditional Chinese medicine (“TCM”) is deeply rooted in Chinese culture, tradition and philosophy. Because of the combination of culture, tradition and philosophy, TCM is inherently integrative providing patients’ comfort, acceptance and, most important, compliance with the TCM therapy. Treating the target health concern in concert with the patient’s mental state expands the TCM integrative approach. Psychotherapy affords the healthcare practitioner the means to treat the mental state of the patient. Treating the health concern in combination with the patient’s mental state may offer successful outcomes or, perhaps, increase the likelihood for success. Given the well documented ‘placebo effect,’ one cannot ignore the benefits of addressing the mental state of patients for successful treatment outcomes. The challenge arises in acceptance of the foregoing approach for several reasons and this poster presentation also considers how to implement an approach.

Nure Kiron

Gonoshasthya Samaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh

Title: A case report of acne vulgaris: Treated by combination of acupuncture
Speaker
Biography:

  

Abstract:

Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinisation, inflammation and bacterial colonization of hair follicles on the face, neck and back by Propionibacterium acnes. There is no ideal treatment for acne, although a suitable regimen for reducing lesions can be found for most patients. New research is needed into the therapeutic comparative effectiveness and safety of the many products available. In this case report it was evaluated, acupuncture therapy used in combination with pharmaceutical medication appeared to be more effective than pharmaceutical medication alone in increasing the number of cured patients with acne. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding. Here a case report of acne treated with acupuncture from Bangladesh is reported and its effectiveness is highlighted.

Speaker
Biography:

Arman Zargaran has completed his PhD from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Traditional Pharmacy and Vice Dean for International Affairs in School of Persian Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. He is also the Member of International Academy of the History of Pharmacy and Iranian Academy of Medical Sciences. He has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and Reviewer of many peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Phytotherapy is a source of finding new remedies for migraine. Traditional chamomile oil (chamomile extraction in sesame oil) is a formulation in Persian Medicine (PM) for pain relief in migraine. An oleogel preparation of reformulated traditional chamomile oil was prepared and then standardized based on chamazulene (as a marker in essential oil) and apigenin via Gas Chromatography (GC) and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods, respectively. A crossover doubleblind clinical trial was performed with 100 patients. Each patient took two tubes of drug and two tubes of placebo during the study. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) questionnaires were filled in by the patients and scores were given, ranging from 0 to 10 (based on the severity of pain) during 24 hours. Other complications like nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia were also monitored. There was 4.48±0.01 μl/ml of chamazulene and 0.233 mg/g of apigenin in the preparation (by correcting the amount with extraction ratio). 38 patients in the drug-placebo and 34 patients in the placebo-drug groups (a total number of 72 patients as per protocol) completed the process in the Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). Adapted results from the questionnaires showed that pain, nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia significantly (p<0.001) decreased by using chamomile oleo-gel on the patients after 30 minutes. Results supported the efficacy of chamomile oleogel as a pain relief in migraine without aura.