Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Global Summit on Herbals & Traditional Medicine Osaka, Japan.

Day 2 :

Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anirban Sukul photo
Biography:

Dr Anirban Sukul completed his PhD from Visva-Bharati University and Research Associateship from same University. He studied homeopathy later. Presently he is the Director of Sukul Institute of Homeopathic Research at Kolkata, India. He has published 21 papers in international Journals and authored a book published by Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands. He has lectured on homeopathy in 14 countries across Asia, Europe, UK and USA. He is conferred the Junior Scientist Award, Life Time Achievement Award, Gold Medal Award (UK), Man of Excellence Award etc from abroad. Dr Sukul is also Member, Research Committee, Liga Medicorum Homoeopathica Internationalis (LMHI), Germany.

Abstract:

Male adult albino mice were administered potentized Nux vomica 30c (Nux). The drug was mixed with distilled water at 0.05ml/2ml water and given at 0.05ml/individual. Control is blank ethanol solution. Ethanolic extract from the seeds of Strychnos nuxvomica was mixed with 90% ethanol 1:100 and sonicated for 30s at 20KHz and further diluted and sonicated in 30 steps to produce Nux 30c. Six hours after treatment, mice were given 25% ethanol i.p. at 4g/kg body wt. The duration of sleep time starting from the loss of righting reflex until its restoration was recorded. Sleep time duration with ethanol was recorded in four sessions for same group of mice with an interval of 10 d between sessions. Treatments: session 1- control solution, 2 - Nux (oral), 3- control solution and 4 - Nux (i.p.). Nux (oral) produced shortest sleep time as compared to other treatments which didn’t differ from each other significantly with respect to sleep time.

In another experiment Nux 30C was prepared with distilled water and pure absolute ethanol by the above process of successive dilution and sonication. These two preparations together with Nux 30c, prepared with 90% ethanol, were tested on mice for their effect on alcohol-induced sleep time. Only Nux 30c prepared with 90% ethanol was effective in reducing the sleep time in mice. It is concluded that the solution structure of ethanol/water mixture carries the specificity of the Nux at ultra high dilution. It is further concluded that the effect is mediated through oral receptors.

Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xin Zhou photo
Biography:

Xin Zhou has completed her PhD at the age of 42 years from West China school of pharmacy, sichuan university. She is the director of Guizhou Engineering Laboratory for Quality Control & Evaluation Technology of Medicine, a premier herbal medicine quality control service organization. She has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

A sensitive, reliable and accurate HPLC-MS-MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of Gallic Acid (GA) and Protocatechuic Acid (PCA) in rat plasma, tissue and excretion. A single-step protein precipitation by acidic acetonitrile was used to prepare samples. GA, PCA and bergenin (internal standard, IS) were separated by using a C18 column and a mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid running at a flow rate of 0.2 ml/min for 10 min. Detection and quantification were performed using a mass spectrometer by the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive electrospray ionization mode. The optimized mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantitation were [M+H] 169.181 →

 

125.268 (GA)、152.918 → 109.244 (PCA) and 326.922 → 192.167 (IS) , respectively. After oral administration of 0.36, 1.08 and 2.16 g·kg-1 of Polygonum capitatum extract, respective values of pharmacokinetic parameters for GA and PCA were: t1/2 1128.52/42.81、93.72/90.15

 

and 114.70/49.80min; Cmax 245.98/11.90, 477.20/24.66, and 805.76/31.04 ng·ml-1. Linear pharmacokinetics was established based on high correlation coefficients (γ > 0.90) of pharmacokinetic parameters. The results of tissue distribution showed that GA mainly distributed in kidney, lung, and liver, while PCA mainly distributed in kidnry and lung. Less than 23.08% and 19.39% prototype of GA and PCA , respectively, were excreted from urine and feces path indicating that GA and PCA are extensively metabolized in rat.

  • Track: 10 Traditional Chinese Medicine | Track: 6 Medicinal Plants | Track: 3 Acupuncture | Track: 9 Ayurveda

Session Introduction

Parunkul Tungsukruthai

Thammasat University, Thailand

Title: Efficacy and Safety of Herbal Hot Steam Bath in Allergic Rhinitis
Speaker
Biography:

Parunkul  Tunsukruthai completed her PhD (medical  sciences) in 2007 at Thammasat University Thailand. She is the lecturer at Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University Thailand. She has published several papers about herbal medicine, puerperium care, Thai massage to relief shoulder pain, and Acute and sub-chronic toxicity study Thai traditional formula.

Abstract:

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a nasal mucosa inflammatory disorder that induced by an allergen exposure resulting in four symptoms including rhinorrhoea, sneezing, nasal itching and nasal congestion. Allergic rhinitis may results in sleep disturbance, fatigue, and quality of life impairment. The objective to examine the efficacy and safety in reducing allergic rhinitis of herbal steam bath compared to the steam bath, and to investigate the quality of life improvement and satisfaction in allergic rhinitis patients. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted on sixty four subjects who equally allocated into two groups. The treatment group was received herbal steam bath, and the control group was received steam bath without herbs for 30 minutes 3 times a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Allergic rhinitis symptoms were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) including itchy nose, runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion and watery eyes at week 0,1,2,3 and week 4. Quality of life was assessed at week 0 and week 4 fond that the characteristics (sex, age, status, education, allergic rhinitis symptoms and frequency of symptoms) at the baseline were shown to be non-statistically significant. In addition, rhinorrhoea, sneezing, nasal itching and nasal congestion symptoms statistically reduced (p value<0.05), but non-significance when compared between treatment and control group. The treatment group was also shown to be significantly satisfied when compared to control group (p<0.05). Both herbal steam bath and normal steam bath had effectiveness in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and were safe to be used as an alternative treatment for allergic rhinitis.

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled Abo-EL-Sooud is a Prof of Pharmacology, Faculty of Vet. Med. Cairo University. He supervised several Master and Ph.D. theses in Egypt and Arabian Countries. He is expertise in Radioisotopes and Chromatography (GC-HPLC-TLC etc.) for detection of drug residues. He is publishing about 66 international papers. Nowadays, the research is shifted to nanotechnology and phytomedicine. Member of Ministry of Health and promotion committee of Supreme Council of Universities committee.

Abstract:

Central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs have many negative side effects including addiction, depression, suicide, convulsion, sexual dysfunction, headaches and more. Moreover, these agents do not restore normal levels of neurotransmitters but instead influence the brain chemistry. In contrast to drugs, a number ethno-botanical products have been identified which reduce anxiety by re-establishing by altering both neurotransmitter levels in the absence of the severe side effects. The bitter orange fruit (Citrus aurantium) contains a number of phytochemicals of interest known to increase the production of dopamine. The purpose of this study is to evaluate Citrus aurantium L. oil ability to induce sedative/hypnotic and/or general anaesthetic effects in experimental models. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Essential oil from peel was obtained by steam distillation, then maintained and protected against light and heat until the pharmacological assays. The main component of the oil was determined by GC-MS. The LD50 of the oil was determined to calculate the therapeutic dose. Experimental models were performed in this study to evaluate the hypnotic and anesthetic effects of C. aurantium as compared with thiopental sodium at a dose of (30 mg kg-1) after intraperitoneal injection (I/P). Findings: The LD50 of the oil was 300 mg kg-1 of body weight after intraperitoneal injection (I/P). The main component of the EOP was d-limonene. The CNS depressant effect of C. aurantium oil is dose dependent. At small dose there was an induction of hypnosis as righting reflex was absent with ataxia. At higher doses the oil induced anesthesia at 8 min and the consciousness is regained in about 25 minutes. Conclusion & Significance: The use of animal model of hypnotic and ultra-short general anaesthetic of C. aurantium oil significantly supports its use an adjunct for the treatment of insomnia and other CNS disorders. Recommendations: Further evaluations are required to elucidate the detailed mechanism of CNS depressant activity and possible side effects of Citrus aurantium and the possibility of its use as alternative natural general anesthetic agent.

Speaker
Biography:

Akihito Iino has graduated Arizona (USA) integrative medicine fellowship in 2014 and Akita medical University (Japan) in 1998. He is a medical doctor, child psychiatrist of Shimada ryoiku center. He has a qualification of Japanese national psychiatrist, child psychiatrist, pediatrician. Additionally, he has a qualification of energy healer at master’s level, hypnotherapist at upper level in Japan. He translated one book of CAM medicine for psychiatric clients, published two medical papers written in Japanese.

Abstract:

Shimada ryoiku center is the child rehabilitation hospital, established in 1963, 1st private hospital for child rehabilitation in Japan. We daily use Kampo for lots of inpatients and outpatients.

At outpatient department, we have 190 patients every day, 46000 patient every year. 49% patients receive drugs, 63% execute rehabilitation of PT,ST,OT,counseling. 36% go to pediatrician, 47% go to child psychiatrist. Child psychiatrists in our hospital use no.1 Yokukansan, 2 Yokukansan-Katinpihange, 3 Syokentyutou. Target symptoms are 1 irritation, 2 insomnia, 3 child infirmity. Kampo 1 and 2 contains Uncaria Thorn(釣藤鈎,Tyoutoukou), this component shows anti-anxiety effect through 5-HT2A. All contains licorice (Kanzou), which reduce tension. Japanese Kampo combinations almost warm up the body of clients. The biggest barrier to use Kampo for children is 1 bitter taste, 2 poor drug management by parents, 3 taking time for beneficial effect. But they are cheap, their price is about 10% from nerve-stimulants, Kampo doesn’t give a financial burden for the family and the government. Under Japanese national healthcare insurance system, outpatient children need 2USD for medical exam and drug.

Next, 232 inpatients stay in our hospital now. They are disabled, have a number of congenital disease, they are accommodated for average of 33 years, because of family problem, abandoned, financial problem etc. 20% inpatients received Kampo, but there are very few side effect.

Dr.Obitu surgical and homeopathy doctor said {CAM is a gentle, moderate medicine}. Few medical evidence (DBRPC), very few side effect, very few money (cheap) , Kampo is of great use for children.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor (Dr.) Prem P. Rai formerly served at the University of Papua New Guinea, School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is currently Dean of the School of Natural Resources & Applied Sciences at Solomon Islands National University. His speciality includes pharmacognosy and quality control aspects of herbal medicine. Dr. Rai headed the traditional medicine program of the National Department of Health in Papua New Guinea for over 15 years. He is an active researcher and has published more than 98 papers and authored number of technical books including one on Medicinal Plants in Papua New Guinea, published by the World Health Organization. Dr. Rai serves as an advisor and member on editorial board of number of local and international scientific journals.

Abstract:

The Traditional Medicine Database (TMD) was established in 2000 to document, preserve and encourage the use of safe and effective traditional medicine practices and ethno-botanical tradition in Papua New Guinea (PNG). One of the early challenges that restricted incorporation of traditional medicine in primary health care program was insufficient documentation about medicinal plants usage as traditional medicine. This has now been addressed by carrying out systematic documentation and maintaining a comprehensive inventory and record of information on local uses of medicinal plants and traditional medicine practices, and by collecting and storing information from the practitioners nationwide to ensure that local knowledge is preserved, researched and properly promoted to community at large. The TMD is extensive, fully referenced, and provides historical use fields and published research information. Specifically, the electronic database contains taxonomical, ethno-botanical, phytochemical, and biological activity data including medicinal uses of herbs with methods of preparation, administration, dosage, frequency, etc. An interesting feature is the plants image file containing pictures of plants taken in their natural habitat. Over the years the TMD has emerged not only as the repository of indigenous knowledge in traditional medicine but has become an important resource for scientific researches on host of medicinal plants. It has also proven to be a useful tool for identifying safe and effective herbs. Many herbs such as Alstonia scholaris (severe fevers), Evodia elleryana (anti-TB, cough and fever), PNG lichen, Parmotrema saccatilobum (analgesic and anti-inflammatory), Ageratum conyzoides (diarrhoea and dysentery), Vocanga papuana (antibacterial), anti -HIV herbs such as Derris elliptica and many others have been investigated, and traditional uses and claimed therapeutic properties substantiated. A well-developed TMD can be an excellent resource in selection of herbs for scientific researches and to provide rationale for host of traditional medicines.

(*formerly with The University of Papua New Guinea)

Speaker
Biography:

Massage Therapist/Craniosacral Therapist/Equine Bodyworker/Certified Lymphedema Therapist/Certified Athletic Trainer 27 years of injury care as an Athletic Trainer and Massage Therapist: Olympic, Paralympic, College, High School, Sportsmedicine Rehabilitation Craniosacral Therapist  treating various issues including pain, insomnia, high blood pressure, anxiety, PTSD, brain injury, Alzheimers, Tinnitus. Specific program treating Veterans as part of a recovery retreat combining horses-counseling-craniosacral therapy. The program is being adapted to treat breast cancer recovery

Equine Bodywork Therapist treating horse’s tissue and joint tension to assist in injury recovery and improved performance

Publication “A case study utilizing myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy to treat bilateral “Stringhalt” in a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse.” Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies. (2016)

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION

“Stringhalt” is a horse condition that causes one or both hind legs to spasm when walking, trotting or backing. The condition is thought to be related to a neurological cause from either plant toxicity or peripheral nerve injury. The prognosis is poor and the horse’s performance and quality of life can be affected. Treatment has included surgically cutting the digital extensors with varied results.

The objective of the study is to utilize soft tissue release via acupressure, trigger point and myofascial release to decrease symptoms of stringhalt.

CASE PRESENTATION

The case study is a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse of excellent pedigree. In 2011, she was caught in barbed wire overnight and sustained lacerations to the bone. Shortly after the injury the horse was placed in a stall for several months and was unable to walk or run, developing stringhalt. Currently, her condition is aggravated by stress and alleviated by certain types of massage (myofascial, acupressure, trigger point release). The incidence of stringhalt occurs every 3-5 minutes, with more frequent and severe symptoms on the right hindlimb. The horse is unable to run or back up. 

METHODS

6 treatments biweekly were performed at 1 to 1 ½ hour sessions. The treatments consisted of myofascial release at the cervical, sacrum and iliums, acupressure of the bladder meridian (including c-spine, t-spine, L-spine, and hamstring), and trigger point release of the iliacus. The stringhalt motion was observed and documented on each of the 6 treatment days for 30 minutes.

RESULTS

After 6 treatments, the horse was seen running and standing in a position that promotes hip extension. She has not been able to do either since the injury. The frequency and severity of the spasms have decreased from every 3-5 minutes to every 10-20 minutes. The horse’s owners report that her disposition, stress and quality of life are much improved.

DISCUSSION

The results suggest that myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy may be utilized to provide a positive treatment outcome in the case of stringhalt. However, please note that the scope of practice varies by state and special training is needed to work with the equine population.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Edwin David Benher is working as Associate Professor and Head, Research Department of Zoology, Virudhunagar Hindu Nadars’ Senthikumara Nadar College (Autonomous), Virudhunagar, Tamilnadu (India) since 1988. To his credit, he has published more than 5 research papers in national and international peer reviewed journals. He has participated and presented his research papers in many National Conferences held in India. Currently he is pursuing research leading to Ph.D Degree in Zoology at Alagappa University, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu (India).

Abstract:

Diabetes is an important and very common disorder among the human beings that are associated with high blood sugar levels which often leads severe complications to the human body. It can also bring serious consequences including death. The main aim of the present study was to document the indigenous knowledge on the usage of medicinal plants to cure diabetes. In the present study, a total of 44 species of plants belonging to 15 families were documented. As far as plant part utility is concerned, leaves are commonly used, followed by bark, whole plant, seeds etc. The formulations are prepared mostly in the form of juice followed by decoction, powder and paste prepared from raw plant parts. To make better acceptability of herbal remedies that are taken orally and additives are not taken internally. The data collected from this study will be useful to the researchers, pharmaceutical companies to discover a novel drug to cure diabetes. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Palanichamy Mehalingam completed his Ph.D Degree in Botany from Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai in 2000. Currently he is working as Assistant Professor in Botany, Virudhunagar Hindu Nadars’ Senthikumara Nadar College (Autonomous), Virudhunagar, Tamilnadu (India). He has produced 25 M.Phil and 9 Ph.D Scholars and also guiding 4 Ph.D Scholars. He has published more than 65 research papers in reputed journals. He has participated and presented his research papers in International Conferences held in The Netherlands, Malaysia, Thailand, China and Lao PDR. He undertook his Post Doctoral Studies (UGC Research Award) at the Department of Botany, VHNSN College (Autonomous), Virudhunagar during 2014-2016. He has been engaged in research on ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, pharmacology and phytochemistry.

Abstract:

An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants used in curing skin diseases was carriedout among Paliyar tribes in Theni district, Tamilnadu (India). The indigenous knowledge of local traditional healers and the native plants used for medicinal purposes were collected through personal interviews during field trips. The plants were arranged family wise followed by botanical name of the plants, locality, ethnomedicinal use in briefs and local name. The voucher specimens have been deposited in herbarium of Department of Botany of VHNSN College (Autonomous), Virudhunagar. The collected plants were identified with referring standard compilations. Plants have been used as healers and health rejuvenators since time immemorial. A total of 65 plant species belonging to 37 families are described along the method of drug preparation, mode of administration, probable dosage and duration of treatment. The aim of the present study is not only to prescribe the remedies for skin diseases in human beings but also an endeavour to draw attention for the need of detailed study on medicinal plants of the area, which could provide better and efficient remedies for many dreadful diseases. This study concluded that many people in studied parts of Western Ghats of Theni district still continue to depend on medicinal plants at least for the treatment of primary healthcare. The traditional healers are dwindling in number and there is a grave danger of traditional knowledge disappearing soon since the younger generation is not interested to carry on this tradition. Hence, It is urgent need for documenting these before such valuable knowledge becomes inaccessible and extinct.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Amulya Dahal is currently working as Ayurveda Medical Officer in Sankhuwasabha, Nepal. He completed his Bachelor Degree in Ayurveda Medicine from Ayurveda Campus, Institute of medicine, Tribhuwan University in 2015. He has many experiences in presenting research talks and papers at national and international conferences. He has published more than 5 research papers in reputed journals.His research Interest are on Ayurveda Medicine, Ethno-medicine, Ethno-Veiterany medicine, Pharmacology, Toxicology and Yoga.

Abstract:

Arsha (Hemorrhoids) is a very common ano-rectal condition affecting as much as half the population by age of 50, and represent a major medical and socioeconomic problem. Many treatment methods have been applied in management of Arsha (Hemorrhoids) disease ranging from dietary and lifestyle modification to para- surgery and surgery, dependingon degree and severity of symptoms. It has been proved by scientific studies that Changeri (Oxalis Corniculata) improve microcirculation, capillary flow, and to strength the surrounding connective tissues of anus and lower rectum. The present case study deals with the oral supplementation of Changeri Ghrita in Arsha (Hemorrhoids) patients, which has prevented the expensive, time-consuming, painful management of Hemorrhoids with good result in symptomatic management of Arsha (Hemorrhoids).

shulammite ogbonna

Biological sciences university of Nigeria, Nigeria

Title: PHYTOCHEMICAL AND ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF Anthocleista djalonensis
Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon

Abstract:

For many years medicinal plants have become a research interest and focus especially for providing primary healthcare needs. This study was carried out to determine the phytochemical properties as well as the antibacterial activities of methanol and ethanol extracts of the dried roots of Anthocleista djalonensis. The whole dried roots specimen of Anthocleista djalonensis was extracted using soxhlet extraction apparatus. These extracts were further screened for antibacterial activity using agar well diffusion technique. Twelve clinical and typed strains of bacteria isolates were tested for susceptibility to these extracts. The bacteria strains used were; Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14724), Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14725),Staphylococcus aureus, typed Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, typed Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, typed  Escherichia coli, Psedomonas aeruginosa, typed Psedomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis.

However, both extracts had significant antimicrobial activity (p<0.05) on ten out of the twelve isolates which includes Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14724), Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14725), Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, typed, Escherichia coli, typed Escherichia coli, Psedomonas aeruginosa, typed Psedomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis. The typed strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi were not susceptible to any of the extracts.

Meanwhile, the phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannin, saponin, reducing sugar, alkaloid, flavonoid and glycosides. These compounds have been found to be responsible for the antibacterial activity of the extracts.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Natarajan Nirmalkumar obtained his Doctoral Degree in Botany from Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli in 2008. At present he is working as Assistant Professor in Botany, Virudhunagar Hindu Nadars’ Senthikumara Nadar College (Autonomous), Virudhunagar, Tamilnadu (India). He has produced 10 M.Phil and also guiding 2 Ph.D Scholars. To his credit, he has published more than 35 research papers in national and international peer reviewed journals. He has participated and presented his research papers in International Conferences held Lao PDR. He is also serving as reviewer in peer reviewed journal. He has been awarded with Bharat Research Award by TRUST, India for his outstanding contribution for the protection of environment.

Abstract:

The present study was aimed to document the medicinal plants which were used to cure diseases in cattle by the traditional healers in Virudhunagar district, Tamil nadu (India). Information on medicinal plants was collected from the traditional healers by adopting semi-structured questionnaire and through open-ended interview. It is evident from the data that leaves constituted the major plant part used (52%) followed by whole plant (34%) and barks (14%). These plants were used to treat appetites, bloat, fever, ephemeral fever, diarrhoea, dysentery, cough, foot  and mouth diseases. About 25 traditional healers were interviewed. From this study, a total of 60 plant species belonging to 26 families were used and described along with drug preparation mode of administration, dosage and duration of the treatment. The main purpose of this study was not only documenting the ethnomedicinal plants used by traditional healers but also maintain with traditional knowledge for the conservation and sustainable utilization of the promising medicinal plants in these area  and also for effective treatment of various ailments in cattle.