Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Global Summit on Herbals & Traditional Medicine Osaka, Japan.

Submit your Abstract
or e-mail to

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

Day 2 :

  • Track: 10 Traditional Chinese Medicine | Track: 6 Medicinal Plants | Track: 3 Acupuncture | Track: 9 Ayurveda
Speaker
Biography:

Massage Therapist/Craniosacral Therapist/Equine Bodyworker/Certified Lymphedema Therapist/Certified Athletic Trainer 27 years of injury care as an Athletic Trainer and Massage Therapist: Olympic, Paralympic, College, High School, Sportsmedicine Rehabilitation Craniosacral Therapist  treating various issues including pain, insomnia, high blood pressure, anxiety, PTSD, brain injury, Alzheimers, Tinnitus. Specific program treating Veterans as part of a recovery retreat combining horses-counseling-craniosacral therapy. The program is being adapted to treat breast cancer recovery

Equine Bodywork Therapist treating horse’s tissue and joint tension to assist in injury recovery and improved performance

Publication “A case study utilizing myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy to treat bilateral “Stringhalt” in a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse.” Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies. (2016)

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION

“Stringhalt” is a horse condition that causes one or both hind legs to spasm when walking, trotting or backing. The condition is thought to be related to a neurological cause from either plant toxicity or peripheral nerve injury. The prognosis is poor and the horse’s performance and quality of life can be affected. Treatment has included surgically cutting the digital extensors with varied results.

The objective of the study is to utilize soft tissue release via acupressure, trigger point and myofascial release to decrease symptoms of stringhalt.

CASE PRESENTATION

The case study is a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse of excellent pedigree. In 2011, she was caught in barbed wire overnight and sustained lacerations to the bone. Shortly after the injury the horse was placed in a stall for several months and was unable to walk or run, developing stringhalt. Currently, her condition is aggravated by stress and alleviated by certain types of massage (myofascial, acupressure, trigger point release). The incidence of stringhalt occurs every 3-5 minutes, with more frequent and severe symptoms on the right hindlimb. The horse is unable to run or back up. 

METHODS

6 treatments biweekly were performed at 1 to 1 ½ hour sessions. The treatments consisted of myofascial release at the cervical, sacrum and iliums, acupressure of the bladder meridian (including c-spine, t-spine, L-spine, and hamstring), and trigger point release of the iliacus. The stringhalt motion was observed and documented on each of the 6 treatment days for 30 minutes.

RESULTS

After 6 treatments, the horse was seen running and standing in a position that promotes hip extension. She has not been able to do either since the injury. The frequency and severity of the spasms have decreased from every 3-5 minutes to every 10-20 minutes. The horse’s owners report that her disposition, stress and quality of life are much improved.

DISCUSSION

The results suggest that myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy may be utilized to provide a positive treatment outcome in the case of stringhalt. However, please note that the scope of practice varies by state and special training is needed to work with the equine population.

Speaker
Biography:

Akihito Iino has graduated Arizona (USA) integrative medicine fellowship in 2014 and Akita medical University (Japan) in 1998. He is a medical doctor, child psychiatrist of Shimada ryoiku center. He has a qualification of Japanese national psychiatrist, child psychiatrist, pediatrician. Additionally, he has a qualification of energy healer at master’s level, hypnotherapist at upper level in Japan. He translated one book of CAM medicine for psychiatric clients, published two medical papers written in Japanese.

Abstract:

Shimada ryoiku center is the child rehabilitation hospital, established in 1963, 1st private hospital for child rehabilitation in Japan. We daily use Kampo for lots of inpatients and outpatients.

At outpatient department, we have 190 patients every day, 46000 patient every year. 49% patients receive drugs, 63% execute rehabilitation of PT,ST,OT,counseling. 36% go to pediatrician, 47% go to child psychiatrist. Child psychiatrists in our hospital use no.1 Yokukansan, 2 Yokukansan-Katinpihange, 3 Syokentyutou. Target symptoms are 1 irritation, 2 insomnia, 3 child infirmity. Kampo 1 and 2 contains Uncaria Thorn(釣藤鈎,Tyoutoukou), this component shows anti-anxiety effect through 5-HT2A. All contains licorice (Kanzou), which reduce tension. Japanese Kampo combinations almost warm up the body of clients. The biggest barrier to use Kampo for children is 1 bitter taste, 2 poor drug management by parents, 3 taking time for beneficial effect. But they are cheap, their price is about 10% from nerve-stimulants, Kampo doesn’t give a financial burden for the family and the government. Under Japanese national healthcare insurance system, outpatient children need 2USD for medical exam and drug.

Next, 232 inpatients stay in our hospital now. They are disabled, have a number of congenital disease, they are accommodated for average of 33 years, because of family problem, abandoned, financial problem etc. 20% inpatients received Kampo, but there are very few side effect.

Dr.Obitu surgical and homeopathy doctor said {CAM is a gentle, moderate medicine}. Few medical evidence (DBRPC), very few side effect, very few money (cheap) , Kampo is of great use for children.

Speaker
Biography:

Doctor of chiropractic (AECC) and physiotherapist (Munich) with special interest in Sports Medicine in private practice based in Cardiff/Wales. Chiropractor at the World Games Cali, 2013; London 2012 Olympic Games; Paralympic Games and World Championships. Very experienced in working with International, Premier league footballers, professional golfers, athletes, sports coaches and company executives.

Education: 2113 -2016 Diploma in Sport and Exercise Medicine, Cardiff Metropolitan University

2009 -2011 MSc Sports and Rehabilitation, Bournemouth University

1992 -1996 BSc Chiropractic, Anglo-European College of Chiropractic,

1985 -1988 Dip Physiotherapy, Orthopedic Hospital, Munich

Specialties: Sports injuries, low back pain, sciatica,

Abstract:

Design: Survey design, quantitative research.

Background: Recent research findings indicate that mental hardiness can be determined reliably with the use of specific self-assessment questionnaires.

Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to determine the level of mental hardiness in a group of professional soccer players using two established questionnaires (modified Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire (SMTQ-M) and Psychological Performance Inventory (PPI-A)) and to investigate the degree of correlation between the scores of these two measures. Further, the study aimed to establish the level of inter-rater agreement between two coaches in rating the level of mental hardiness of their players, and whether the results of the players’ self-assessments agreed with the coaches’ ratings.

Setting: A professional championship football club in Wales.

Subjects: Convenience sample of 20 professional soccer players and two football coaches.

Methods: After written and witnessed consent, two self-assessment questionnaires (modified PPI-A and SMTQ-M) were completed by the football players. Two coaches, who did not know the outcome scores of the players’ self-assessments, independently rated each player. Each player was awarded a percentage score for each test, and an average percentage score ({SMTQ-M % + PPI-A %} ÷ 2). Mean scores were established for the whole team, International players and Non-International players. The PPI-A and SMTQ-M scores obtained for each player were analyzed for correlation with Pearson’s correlation. The ratings of the coaches were analyzed for agreement with Kappa-statistics. Finally, the data were analyzed with Kappa-statistics to determine whether the players’ self-ratings agreed with the coaches’ ratings.

Results: The average ({SMTQ-M % + PPI-A %} ÷ 2) mean score was 77 %, (SD = 7.98). The independent t-test (p = 0.04) showed that international players scored on average 7.4 % higher than non-international players. The players’ scores obtained from the PPI-A and SMTQ-M correlated well (r = 0.709, p < 0.001). The ratings of the players by the two coaches showed a significant, but weak to moderate agreement (Cohen's kappa = 0.33). No statistical significant agreement was found between player self-assessments and the ratings given by the coaches.

Conclusions: There is significant correlation between SMTQ-M and PPI-A scores. The levels of mental hardiness in professional football players can be assessed with both questionnaires. Higher performers had a slightly higher mental hardiness score. The results would suggest that either coaches were not able to judge the mental hardiness levels of their players appropriately, or that the players over- or under-rated their own mental hardiness and therefore, made it impossible for coaches to concur with the players’ self-ratings.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hsieh has complete the Chinese Medicine Doctor scholarship from China Medical University in Taiwan. He is serving as a Chief Resident Doctor of Chinese Medicine in Department of Chinese Medicine, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital. He has intensively study in ShangHanLun and the Pulse Diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Abstract:

Introduction

Generally, western medicine treat patients with insomnia disorder in inhibiting or releasing way. But in the concept of Yin-Yang in Traditional Chinese Medicine(TCM), it’s not always effective to the Yang Deficiency patients, especially the Heart Yang Deficiency ones. We consider that being frightened could leads to Heart Yang Deficiency and Spirit-Restless Pattern in TCM.

Material and Methods

This case is a 64-year-old woman, suffered from domestic violence intermittently in 2015 and then divorced. After that, insomnia disorder, palpitation, empty feeling in chest, panic and anxiety was noted. Also, she dreamed about being hit accompanied with somniloquy and waving arms every night for about a year. There’s also weak pulse in cun position of both wrist pulse. Those symptoms and pulse findings are the same features as the Heart Yang Deficiency. Therefore, we treated her by warming Heart Yang and settling the Spirit formula (extract powder of Guizhi-Gancao-Longgu-Muli Decoction桂枝甘草龍骨牡蠣湯) 2.6gm four times a day since 2017/1/5.

Result

After the first week receiving the formula, there’s still dreamful sleep, but the palpitation partially relieved. After the second week, dream alleviated with only somniloquy left. Palpitation, empty feeling in chest and panic also relieved obviously. There was no significant side effect during or after the treatment.

Conclusion

We suggest that warm Heart Yang and settling the Spirit formula (Guizhi-Gancao-Longgu-Muli Decoction桂枝甘草龍骨牡蠣湯) is an effective and safe treatment for the Heart Yang Deficiency patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Ming-Cheng Lin has his expertise in the field of toxicology, especially in studying the toxic effects of the herbicide of paraquat on the influences of the level of essential trace element and antioxidant enzyme activity. He has recently paid more efforts on exploring the protective mechanism of some Traditional Chinese Medicines on cerebral ischemic insult.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Recent investigation has demonstrated that Antrodia Camphorata (AC) has received a great deal of attention due to its beneficial effects such as anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. Excessive transition metal level of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) has been proposed to be harmful to the health. In this current experiment, we hypothesis that neuroprotective mechanisn of AC is associated with reducing level of Fe and Cu, and enhancing antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the ischemic brain. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and AC-treated subject. Both groups were intraperitoneally injected with saline and AC for 14 days, respectively. On day 15, cerebral ischemic surgery was performed by occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and right common carotid artery (CCA) for 1 hour. After completing surgery, rats were sacrificed and right brain cortex was isolated followed by homogenates. Supernatants were collected and ready for analysis of Fe and Cu level. Meanwhile, enzyme activity of SOD, CAT, GPX, and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were measured. Conclusion & Significance: Obtained data showed that level of Fe, Cu, and MDA was obviously declined (P < 0.05) in AC-treated subject. Conversely, a statistical (P < 0.05) enhancement of the enzyme activity of SOD, CAT, and GPX was found in AC-treated group. Based on our current findings, it seems likely to manifest the possibility here that neuroprotective mechanisms of AC are associated with declining Fe and Cu level together with enhancing enzyme activity of SOD, CAT, and GPX on the ischemic brain.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof  Sulukkana  Noiprasert at Mae Fah Luang University MFU, Thailand. She Studied at Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine and Studied Faculty of Medicine at มหาวิทยาลัยเชียงใหม่

Abstract:

Objective

To compare the effectiveness difference between moxibustion and auricular acupressure in the patients with primary dysmenorrhea.

Methods

Fifty three students with the diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea were recruited for the study. Their dysmenorrhea severity was rated by visual analogue scale (VAS) immediately prior to entry into the study. They were randomly divided into two groups; and the following menstrual cycle they were given auricular acupressure treatment (experimental group, n=31) or moxibustion treatment (control group, n=22). The auricular acupressure was applied to uterus, liver and shenmen point for 7 days before menstruation and the moxibustion was applied to guanyuan(GV4) for 15 min, once daily for 7 days before menstruation. After treatment VAS score was rated again during menstruation in both groups.

Results

There was no statistically significant difference in VAS score between two groups (p>0.05) before treatment.  After one menstrual cycle treatment, VAS score were significantly decrease in both groups (p<0.05). Mean pain scores decreased by 59.5% and 44.1% in the auricular acupressure group and moxibustion group, respectively. Between two groups, there was no statistically significant difference in the VAS score (p>0.05) after treatment.

Conclusion

Auricular acupressure was as effective as moxibustion for pain relief in the patients with primary dysmenorrhea. Thus, the use of auricular acupressure should be promoted in treating primary dysmenorrhea.

Key words: auricular acupressure, moxibustion, primary dysmenorrhea

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nadia Mohd Effendy obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Biomedical Sciences from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) in 2011 and Doctorate degree in Pharmacology in 2014 at the age of 25, from the same University. She was appointed as Assistant Professor at Cyberjaya University College of Medical Sciences from 2014-2015. She is currently Senior Lecturer in Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, Islamic Science University of Malaysia. She has many experiences in presenting research talks and papers at national and international conferences. She has also published tremendous articles in highly esteemed journals. Her research interests are on Pharmacology, Alternative & Complementary Medicine, Toxicology, Radiology, Drug Metabolism and Bone Metabolism.

Abstract:

Background: Labisia pumila var. alata (LP) has shown potential as an anti-osteoporotic agent in recent years. The crude extract of LP was reported to reverse trabecular microarchitecture changes induced by ovariectomy. The mechanism is still unclear but it may be elucidated by examining the bone molecular pathways. This study aimed to evaluate the bone-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines expressions to provide a mechanistic overview on how the different LP extracts could prevent degenerative bone changes. Methods: Forty-eight female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomized control (OVX), ovariectomized and given oestrogen at 64.5µg/kg (ERT), ovariectomized and given LP aqueous extract at 100 mg/kg (LPaq), ovariectomized and given LP methanol extract at 100 mg/kg (LPmet) and ovariectomized and given LP ethanol extract at 100 mg/kg (LPet) All treatments were given daily via oral gavages for nine weeks. Rats were then euthanized and femora dissected out for genes and cytokines expressions analysis.  Results: Among the extracts, LPaq was found to produce the highest expressions of OPG, osteocalcin, osterix, osteonectin and ALP. LPaq was also shown to down-regulate the expressions of RANKL, MMP9, M-CSF as well as cytokine IL-1β. Conclusion: Aqueous extract is the best extract of LP which may exert anti-osteoporosis activity by regulating the bone-related genes and cytokines expressions.

Speaker
Biography:

Edward Laurence Opena has been teaching college biology for 10 years. He taught various biology subjects such as general biology, plant physiology, animal physiology, immunology and taxonomy. Aside from teaching, he is also academically active as a university researcher, whose research studies is focus on plants. His current research study is on leaf shape analyses and the effects of magnetic field on the physiology of economically-significant crops such as Brassica species. His hobby is on nature photography and filmmaking.

Abstract:

Euphorbia hirta’s effects on the blood chemistry in albino mice (Mus musculus) had been investigated in this study. There were 15 mice per gender (10 experimental, 5 control). 0.5 mL of the 1:10 g:mL decoction was administered after 40 days of acclimatization. Approximately 2 hours after the oral administration of the extract, 0.5 mL of blood was obtained through intracardiac extraction. Laboratory tests showed that in males, only K showed significant decrease and none in females (p=0.001). Analyses on the degree variation between male and female, significant changes were observed to have occurred in their levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and uric acid (p=0.048, 0.035, 0.006, respectively). Highest electrolyte decrease was male’s K (26.5%), and female’s UA for blood chemistry (30.1%), while highest increase males’ Na and females’ BUN was observed (7.9% and 25.5%, respectively). It is then hypothesized that hormones may play in the blood chemistry and not much in the electrolytes. Further, it could also be that the extracted molecules do not react on individual molecules, rather than more complicated molecules such as those in the blood chemistry. Using other extracting method and longer periods of extract administration can be considered for further investigation.

Ratnaprabha S.Chaudhari

Director- Havya Ayurvedalaya, India

Title: Role of Ayurvedic herbs in Infertility
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Ratnaprabha S. Chaudhari, completed B.A.M.S. (Ayurvedacharya), M.D.(A.M.)

P.G.D.E.M.S. (Post graduate diploma in emergency medical services),

P.G.D.I.H.M. (Post graduate diploma in industrial health management),

Practicing core in infertility, skin and hair care.

Director-Havya Ayurvedacharya, specialized preventive clinic,

Researcher in skin problems

Presented research paper in April-2017 at London, UK Ayurveda conference

Presently working on Psoriasis and stress factor treatment

Published papers in many ayurveda magazines, related infertility and skin care

Active member of many national and international organizations

Abstract:

Nowadays, infertility has main impact on society and world. Infertility either in male or females causes generalized impact on family health.

Ayurveda is science of traditional Indian herbs which includes herbal medicines with some procedures of panchkarma which helps not only cures but prevents disease and its complications.

Infertility and ayurveda correlates in different ways to treat. Important aspect is detoxification of body to grow healthy ovum and sperm which leads to healthy child. And so detoxification of male and female both, pooves very good results in treating infertility.

But, in many cases with some complications related hormonal imbalance or physical problems proved to be treated very well with internal ayurvedic herbs along with panchkarma. Male and female infertility are two individual groups which can be distinguished and treated accordingly. Medicinal herbs and panchkarma varies in

Also specific dietary herbs that can improve fertility are advised to give additive effects in results.

Thereby, infertility treated with internal herbs, dietary changes and detoxification by panchkarma gives almost positive results in many cases.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Fanyana Mtunzi has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from University of North-West (South Africa) He is the Senior Lecturer and Researcher at Vaal University of Technology. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Medicinal plants provides valuable alternative as sources of drugs and drug discovery since many have been used in traditional practices for centuries to manage or cure various forms of ailments. Plants in this research were selected on the basis of an ethno-botanical survey based on questionnaire responses and verbal interviews that was conducted in Mabandla village in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Bioassay guided study involving anti-inflammatory studies measurements of LOX activity effected by a reaction medium containing 15-LOX, linoleic acid in buffer at pH 9 for 30 to 90 seconds after adding plant extract/fraction, free radical scavenging capacity against the ABTS●+ radical cation and DPPH radicals; antimicrobial and bioautography assays against Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli, ATCC25922, Candida albicans and A. fumigatus were carried out on the plants extracts, fractions and pure compounds. Isolation of compounds displaying biological activity was also carried out by use of open column chromatography and preparative TLC. The compounds were characterised by use of Nuclear Magnetic resonance, NMR, Mass Spectra, and Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy.

The DPPH sprayed TLC displayed that all the nine plants contain antioxidants most of which are contained in polar fractions of acetone and methanol. Results of the assays displayed a range of biological activities comparable to the positive controls used for each assay. DPPH scavenging displayed EC50 values ranging between 1.008 and 467 mg/L. The highest activity is obtained from methanol fraction of Berkheya setifera with EC50 value of 1.008 mg/L within 0.5376 to 1.890 at 95 %confidence limit followed by crude fraction of Gunnera perpensa with EC50 value of 1.069 mg/L within 0.5222 to 2.188 at 95 % confidence limit. Carissa bispinosa hexane fraction displayed the lowest activity of 467.7 mg/L within 264.0 to 828.5 at 95 % confidence limit. Highest ABTS●+ radical scavenging was demonstrated by Pomaria sandersonii DCM, (1.273 mg/L at 0.9439 to 1.719 within 95% confidence limit) for the Ethyl acetate, (5.973 mg/L at 4.722 to 7.555 within 95% confidence limit while the lowest activity was displayed by hexane fraction from Eucomis autumnalis (929.4 mg/L at 557.5 to 1550 within 95% confidence limit)The activity of Pomaria sandersonii extracts and fractions demonstrated that the plant contains antioxidants that react with both DPPH and ABTS radicals although higher activities were shown by ABTS as displayed by the lower EC50 values. All of the crude fractions and extracts displayed high to moderate anti-bacterial activity (20 -625 µg/ml) and anti-fungal activity (20 -2500 µg /ml). P. sandersonii crude and fractions demonstrated highest antimicrobial activity compared to other plants. Some MIC values P. sandersonii DCM and ethyl acetate (80 µg /ml in each case) compared well with gentamycin (4 µg /ml) same value against S aureus, E. faecalis, E Coli and P aeruginosa. Anti-fungal activities of the DCM, acetone and methanol fractions were also highly active (20 µg /ml) for both C. a. and A. f. Inhibition of pathogen growth demonstrated by the polar fractions indicate that most of the active compounds would be soluble in water. P. Prunelloides, crude methanol extract produced 60% sucrose component and G. perpensa, 36% was glucose. Three compounds isolated from Alepidea amatymbica and three from Pomaria sandersonii which displayed high antimicrobial activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Gurcharan Kaur has scientifically validated the Indian traditional practices of Natural products from medicinal plants. Her laboratory presented the first ever pre-clinical evidence for Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts as potential agents with capability for neuronal differentiation, an attractive supplementary therapeutic approach for the treatment of brain cancers. An in vivo study from her lab explored the anxiolytic and immunomodulatory potential of ASH-WEX in acute sleep deprived female Wistar rats. ASH-WEX treated animals showed reduced anxiety in Elevated Plus Maze test along with reduction in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6. ASH-WEX was also instrumental in enhancing cell survival and reducing apoptosis as witnessed from downregulation of NFκB, AP-1, cytochrome c and upregulation of Bcl-xL. Her detailed mechanistic studies of potential interventions by natural products promise to offer a unique therapeutic strategy in amelioration of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders associated with obesity and sleep disorders.

Abstract:

Search for herbal medicines that may act as therapeutic agents is an active area of research to combat the diseases such as stroke, head trauma, multiple sclerosis and various neurodegenerative disorders. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history of rejuvenating health in Ayurveda, the traditional system of medicine in India. The ongoing study in our lab is aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Withania somnifera leaf water extract (ASH-WEX) may confer protection against LPS induced neuroinflammation. Microglial BV2 cell line was tested for anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic potential of ASH-WEX. Cell viability and the expression of glial and microglial cell differentiation markers was examined in LPS activated cells in the presence and absence of ASH-WEX. We demonstrated that LPS challenged microglia cell line BV2, and glial cell line C6 Glioma when exposed to LPS, undergo activation that was accompanied by change in cellular morphology and specific markers expression such as GFAP, Iba 1, tubulin as well as transcription factors like AP-1, NF-kappaB, c-jun,, c-fos etc. Further the expression of plasticity markers NCAM and PSA-NCAM was evaluated to establish their role in ASH-WEX mediated neuroprotection. The study was further extended to explored the in vivo effects and the expression of key inflammatory molecules (NF-κB, Iba1, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6), glial markers (Iba1, GFAP) were studied in the hippocampus and pyriform cortex (PC) regions of rat brain exposed to LPS and ASH-WEX treatment. The data suggests that ASH-WEX or its active components may have therapeutic potential for prevention of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration associated with neuroinfections

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Amulya Dahal is currently working as Ayurveda Medical Officer in Sankhuwasabha, Nepal. He completed his Bachelor Degree in Ayurveda Medicine from Ayurveda Campus, Institute of medicine, Tribhuwan University in 2015. He has many experiences in presenting research talks and papers at national and international conferences. He has published more than 5 research papers in reputed journals.His research Interest are on Ayurveda Medicine, Ethno-medicine, Ethno-Veiterany medicine, Pharmacology, Toxicology and Yoga.

Abstract:

Arsha (Hemorrhoids) is a very common ano-rectal condition affecting as much as half the population by age of 50, and represent a major medical and socioeconomic problem. Many treatment methods have been applied in management of Arsha (Hemorrhoids) disease ranging from dietary and lifestyle modification to para- surgery and surgery, dependingon degree and severity of symptoms. It has been proved by scientific studies that Changeri (Oxalis Corniculata) improve microcirculation, capillary flow, and to strength the surrounding connective tissues of anus and lower rectum. The present case study deals with the oral supplementation of Changeri Ghrita in Arsha (Hemorrhoids) patients, which has prevented the expensive, time-consuming, painful management of Hemorrhoids with good result in symptomatic management of Arsha (Hemorrhoids).

shulammite ogbonna

Biological sciences university of Nigeria, Nigeria

Title: PHYTOCHEMICAL AND ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF Anthocleista djalonensis
Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon

Abstract:

For many years medicinal plants have become a research interest and focus especially for providing primary healthcare needs. This study was carried out to determine the phytochemical properties as well as the antibacterial activities of methanol and ethanol extracts of the dried roots of Anthocleista djalonensis. The whole dried roots specimen of Anthocleista djalonensis was extracted using soxhlet extraction apparatus. These extracts were further screened for antibacterial activity using agar well diffusion technique. Twelve clinical and typed strains of bacteria isolates were tested for susceptibility to these extracts. The bacteria strains used were; Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14724), Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14725),Staphylococcus aureus, typed Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, typed Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, typed  Escherichia coli, Psedomonas aeruginosa, typed Psedomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis.

However, both extracts had significant antimicrobial activity (p<0.05) on ten out of the twelve isolates which includes Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14724), Bacillus cereus (NLCC 14725), Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, typed, Escherichia coli, typed Escherichia coli, Psedomonas aeruginosa, typed Psedomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis. The typed strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi were not susceptible to any of the extracts.

Meanwhile, the phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannin, saponin, reducing sugar, alkaloid, flavonoid and glycosides. These compounds have been found to be responsible for the antibacterial activity of the extracts.

Masood Sepehrimanesh

Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Herbal treatment of ulcerative colitis
Speaker
Biography:

Masood Sepehrimanesh s an Iranian Biochemist who is known for his studies on electromagnetic field emitted by cell phone on reproductive system. He is expert in Biochemistry, proteomics and animal modeling. Her experimental model based on acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis creates new way for evaluation of beneficial effects of traditional plants. He also deeply worked on biological effects of electromagnetic field exposure using simulation of exposure condition in animal model. His peer-reviewed publication in several journals are in cooperation with scientists with different expertise. Now he works as Faculty staff and also Laboratory Dean of Gastroenterohepatology Research Center affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is one of the clinical figures of inflammatory bowel disease which presented by clinical manifestations of abdominal pain, diarrhea, and blood in stool. This diseases has annual incidence of is 243 per 1,000,000 persons in Europe and is more common in Iran. Therefore, its prevention and treatment has high importance for clinician and also affected patients. In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to explore the possibility of using traditional plants to possess their therapeutic effects. I and my colleagues focused on the therapeutic and healing properties of some traditional plants and their derivatives in experimentally acetic acid induced UC in rat. This model is selected for our studies due to similar pathophysiological mechanism to those occurred in human UC. The beneficial properties of certain plant species such as Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort), combination of grapeseed and sesame oils, Melilotus officinalis (yellow sweet clover), and Calendula officinalis (marigold) in treatment and healing of UC lesions were reported by our team. Indeed, we found that these plants are richen from free radical scavenging agents include polyphenols (such as catechin and cinnamic acid) and other substances which decrease the oxidative stress and inflammation in the colon tissue, heal the pathological lesions and modulate the microbial population of the colon. On the other hand the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects of these plants had clear role in treatment of UC lesions. Such properties can be summarized in the Figure 1. Based on this proposal that other plants which noted in traditional medicine as therapeutic agent for clone ulcers maybe have similar mechanism of action, therefore, performing animal model studies to confirm the reported effects scientifically using acetic acid and other models such as dextran sodium sulfate, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, oxazolone, and indomethacin are highly recommended.