Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Global Summit on Herbals & Traditional Medicine Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Janethy Balakrishnan Bokstrom

Institute of Integrated Regenerative Medicine Malaysia

Keynote: Ancient fats/oils to reverse metabolic disorders
Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Janethy Balakrishnan Bokstrom photo
Biography:

Dr. Janethy's impressive global and local achievements within a span of 27 years of her clinical career, speaks volumes about a Master Trainer who believes in empowering people, because health is a basic human right and is everyone's responsibility. Healthcare should not be just delivered but greatly encouraged by well informed self-care. She heads AIMM's thrust to integrate allopathic, non-allopathic and related medical professionals into one cohesive unit.

Abstract:

Fats were the cornerstones of our ancient diet. This is due to fats’ high nutrient density that is needed for brain development, general growth and reproduction.

Our early ancestors lived before the days of commercial food processing and before the addition of preservatives, coloring agents, synthetic flavoring, trans fats, GMOs, etc. Hence, their diets have been described as ‘simple, basic, pure and safe’.

Sadly, for more than six decades we’ve been misled to believe that saturated fat and cholesterol causes heart disease. It’s such a deeply ingrained belief that people neither challenged nor even dared questioned the science behind it.

Now, there is overwhelming support and mounting evidence that low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high saturated fat diet is the well-founded formula to prevent and treat metabolic diseases. There are more than 700 published articles including data to prove the health benefits of saturated fats.

It had been well elucidated that processed carbohydrates and excess dietary proteins are the root cause of mitochondrial dysfunction, chronic inflammation, glycation as well as fueling cancer cell growth.

A common observation in studies is that Insulin resistance causes the metabolic cascade of degenerative disorders. Insulin signaling, mTOR and autophagy control cellular mechanisms and signaling pathways regulating ageing. Dietary fat is the only source of energy that does not trigger insulin spikes which is one of the causes of insulin resistance.

We had conducted clinical studies on 670 patients with Palm kernel oil over the past year. PKB is 82% saturated fat, out of which 48% to 50 % is Lauric acid. In a nutshell, results are strongly positive and impressive with regards to clinical signs and symptoms in this revisited up-and -coming ancient fat.

Keynote Forum

Karin Kraft

University Medicine Rostock, Germany

Keynote: Medicinal Herbal Products versus Botanicals - the European Position
Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Karin Kraft photo
Biography:

Karin Kraft is qualified in internal medicine and naturopathy, and holds the chair of naturopathy at the University Medicine of Rostock, Germany since 2002. She has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals and is president of the German Society on Phytotherapy since 2010

Abstract:

In Europe, herbal medicinal drugs (HMPs), and food, including food supplements, have different legal definitions (Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation 1924/2006, respectively). They therefore must be clearly separated. HMPs have pharmacological effects and are used for therapy, relief, prevention or diagnosis of diseases. They are subdivided into HMPs with the status well-established use (proven efficacy by at least one sufficient clinical study, proven quality and tolerability, and indications for mainly mild diseases), and HMPs with the status traditional use (proven quality and tolerability, and indications for minor health problems). On the contrary, foods and food supplements have physiological effects and are primarily used for nutrition or health-related effects by healthy consumers. There is no commitment to control for their quality and tolerability, and they are promoted by a health claim. In the EU, food supplements produced from plants and their preparations (“botanicals”) until now very often have unapproved health claims reminding of the indication of HMPs with traditional use status. However, consumers have to be informed correctly on the nutrition and health value of plants and their preparations contained in food and food supplements in order to be able to choose the appropriate product for their needs. Hence, all health claims should be based on relevant health-related effects that have been proven by adequate scientific evaluation

Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad Akhtar Siddiqui photo
Biography:

Professor, Dept of Moalejat, Faculty of Medicine (Unani) since 07-09-2009.

Dean, School of Unani Medicine, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi-62. Since 14-06-2017.

Consultant Physician in Majeedia Unani Hospital since 1981.

 Former Medical Superintendent of Majeedia Unani Hospital.

Honours/Recognition by Govt. of India

Nominated from the Ministry of AUYSH, Govt. of India as expert physician of unani medicine for representation  of Unani system of medicine in the parade of Republic day of 26th January 2015.Nominated from Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India, and Gazette notification 13. 04. 2015 for Membership of ASU Drug technical advisory board.Selected for National award by Ministry of Ayush, Govt. of India for best teacher in Clinical research of Unani Medicine on 11-02-2017.Letter of appreciation and recognition by Honorable Vice chancellor of Jamia Hamdard on 03-05-2016.Letter of appreciation and recognition by Honorable Vice chancellor of Jamia Hamdard on 16-02-2017.

Abstract:

Chronic Hepatitis B (CHB) is a viral infection caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) which produces a chronic necro-inflammatory condition in the liver. A number of Unani formulations have been used successfully in the treatment of hepatitis in Unani medicine since centuries. India has second highest HBV infected population after China with over 40 million hepatitis B infected patients and alone contributes 9% of the total CHB cases of the world. Most people with CHB in India are unaware of their HBV infection, putting them at a serious risk of developing cirrhosis or liver cancer which are life threatening. Antiviral drugs such as entecavir, tenofovir, interferon etc. leads to kidney deterioration, nausea,  vomiting, thrombocytopenia, resistance on prolong usage as well as highly expensive when used for longer duration. We have evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of decoctions of Unani herbal drugs in the management of chronic hepatitis B in 30 patients. Decoctions were given orally for morning and evening dose for 3 months. Test drug was evaluated for its efficacy and safety on HBsAg, HBeAg, HBV DNA, liver function test (LFT), kidney function test (KFT), blood sugar, haemogram and urine examination at 45 days and 3 months. Highly significant results were observed on HBsAg, HBeAg, HBV DNA, liver function test (LFT) which provide evidence that the decoction of Unani herbal drugs had antiviral, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and analgesic effects. The test drugs were found safe and effective for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B.

  • Track:1 Herbal Medicine | Track:2 Traditional Medicine | Track:4 Alternative Medicine | Track:7 Pharmacognosy & Phytochemistry
Speaker
Biography:

Younghee Yun has completed her PhD from college of Traditional Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. From 2007 to June, 2017, she had worked as a clinical assistant professor of allergic/derma clinic of the Kyunghee University Korean medicine hospital at gangdong, conducted clinical studies in allergic skin diseases, and has published more than 12 papers. She is the CEO of CY Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., a herbal medicine manufacturing and development company. Her main interest is atopic dermatitis, allergic skin disease and pharmacological action of herbal medicine.

Abstract:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common pruritic inflammatory skin disease. In its chronic stage, hyperpigmentation, excoriation, lichenification, and dryness are the main symptoms. Jaungo comprises two herbs, Lithospermi radix and Angelica gigantis radix, and three carrier oils, and is an approved herbal ointment for xerosis in Korea. In past preclinical studies, we demonstrated that Jaungo had anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic activity. We conducted a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, single-centre trial with three parallel arms. Trial group 1 applies Jaungo twice a day, while trial group 2 applies Jaungo and the placebo once a day, separately, and the placebo group applies the placebo twice a day, for a total of 3 weeks each. Participants evaluated for eczema based on the Eczema Area and Severity score, the SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis Score, the Dermatology Life Quality score, transepidermal water loss, total IgE level, eosinophil count, and IL-17, IL-22, and IFN-γ levels. The outcomes to evaluate the safety included Draize score and blood test. In total, 28 patients (82.4%) completed the study. Significant decline of EASI scores in trial group 2 and placebo group was observed (p<0.05). There was significant decline of SCORAD scores in trial group 1 and placebo group (p<0.05). However, Patients in all groups showed decreased TEWL and DLQI scores with no significant difference. No clinically relevant changes in laboratory values were observed except IL-17. There was significant decline of IL-17 in all groups (p<0.05). Inter-group analysis showed no significant difference. No serious adverse event was observed.

Speaker
Biography:

Jurairat Boonruab earned her Ph.D. from Chulalongkorn University, Thailand in 2015. She is currently Deputy Head of the Academic Affairs Department and a lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine of Thammasat University, Thailand. Her areas of specialization include applied Thai traditional medicine, alternative medicine, and public health science. She has published Thai massage and Heber medicine.

Abstract:

Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is one of the most prevalent illnesses among those in the working age group caused by poor ergonomics, especially remaining in a sitting posture for an extended period of time. One alternative treatment for MPS is the application of a hot herbal compress, which helps to improve the quality of life of patients and reduce the undesirable side effects of pain relief medication. A controlled trial was conducted in which 90 participants were randomized into the hot herbal compress group (n=30), the hot compress group (n=30), and the topical diclofenac group (n=30). The first two groups received a 20-minute hot herbal compress and hot compress treatment not exceeding the temperature of 40 °C once a week for two weeks, whereas the last was administered 2 mg of a topical diclofenac gel three times a day for two weeks. Before and after the treatment, their level of pain intensity and quality of life was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. Additionally, their cervical range of motion (CROM) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were also evaluated. It was found that all the three groups experienced a statistically significant decrease in the level of pain intensity (p<0.05), a statistically significant increase in CROM (p<0.05), a statistically significant increase in PPT (p<0.05), and a statistically significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.05). However, for the last two assessment criteria, the results for the hot herbal compress group and the hot compress group were not only relatively equal but also better than those for the topical diclofenac group.

Speaker
Biography:

Capt. Dr. Chaiwat Thepsena,RTN has completed MD at the age of 24 years from Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, furthered his studies acupuncture and moxibustion from Shanghai, M.S.c.(medical epidemiology) and also studied about neural therapy.  He practices for CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) nineteen years at Somdech Phra Pinklao Hospital, Naval Medical Deparment.

Abstract:

Qing Kai Ling is known for neuro protective effect by relieving the damage of vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibiting the process of inflammation and also increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide syntheses. Clear body heat and detoxification is another benefit effect from Qing Kai Ling. During 10 years of usage this injection among 25,000 patients of coronary heart decease, cerebrovascular decease, chronic renal failure, respiratory tract infection, and cancer patients. The results appear so fantastic. Most of the patients become better after being treated. Coronary Artery Stenosis and Cerebral Artery thrombosis patients have evaluated by CT scan which show disappear of occlusion. Only four patients become worse with hypotension but recovery after using moxibustion.

Speaker
Biography:

Kusuma Sriyakul   completed her PhD (Thai traditional and Alternative Medicine) in 2012 at  Chulalongkorn University Thailand. She is the lecturer at Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University Thailand. She has published several papers about herbal medicine in dysmenorrheal, Thai traditional formula.

Abstract:

Yanang Daeng (Bauhinia strychnifolia Craib.) was used for a treatment of poisoning, elimination of pesticides, an effect of poisonous mushrooms, poisoning, breast  milk stimulation in women after delivery and reduce fatigue, the study aimed to gather the knowledge and experience from the folk healers about the usage of Yanang Daeng. This study was conducted using in-depth interview and group discussions from folk healers in four sectors throughout Thailand. The results showed those 59 folk healers from 4 sectors which consisted of 67.80% male and 32.20% female. Furthermore, the age of the participants was studied and the results showed that they aged ranged among 61-80, 41-60, 20-40 and more than 81 years old which respectively accounted for 49.15%, 30.51%, 13.56% and 6.78%. For the treatment of patients who receive the toxins, some folk healers will grind the root with water or water from washing rice, then the patient will be immediately received a single dose portion of 2 tablespoons, but the others will boil the leave and stems and give the patient a single dose portion range from ½ to 1 glass. In emergency case, they will use 10 fresh leaves, then squeeze with water or water from washing rice, and immediately give to patient as a potion. Moreover, the folk healers recommended to the villager that they should use leaves rather than using vine or root to prevent the extinction and also suggested them to plant for convenient use. Yanang Daeng is potent in solving the urgent poisoning problem in the community before receiving further treatment.

Raymond Cooper

Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Title: Discovering Ancient Wheat Varieties as Functional Foods
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Ray Cooper was born in the UK, received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry and after 15 years in R&D in the pharmaceutical industry, he moved to the dietary supplements industry. He developed new Chinese botanicals as supplements including Cholestin, Cordymax and Te-Green.

Currently Ray is visiting professor and lecturer at the HK Polytechnic University and co-founder of PhytoScience LLC, a consulting company creating innovative botanical solutions and products.

He is the recipient of the 2014 American. Society Pharmacognosy Tyler Prize for his life time contributions to Botanical Research. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Chemical Society, UK.

Ray has recently published three books:  Natural Products Chemistry: Sources, Separations and Structures (CRC PRESS) and Botanical Miracles, Plants that Changed the World, and Chinese and Botanical Medicines. He has edited 5 books, most recently, Botanical Medicine: from Bench to Bedside and published over 100 peer reviewed scientific articles.

Abstract:

With the gluten-free food market worth almost $3.6bn in 2016, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains. This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods. In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative.

Ancient grains include chia, a forgotten food of the ancient Aztecs; quinoa which originated in the Andean region of Ecuador, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru; triticum (wheat), in the form of einkorn, known today as farro in Italy, as a type of awned wheat and one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. Other grains, acknowledged as gluten-free ancient grains are amaranth, eaten in Mexico since the time of the Aztecs; quinoa, sorghum, millet; and teff, the main ingredient in the stable fermented flatbread, injera, in Ethiopia. A description of modern wheat is presented together with each one of the above mentioned grains-

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Tshikalange is a senior Lecturer in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences of the University of Pretoria, South Africa. His research focus areas include ethno-botanical medicinal plants used traditionally in the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, oral pathogens and antimicrobial activities. He has published articles in peer reviewed national and international journals, such as the South African Journal of Botany and Journal of Ethnopharmacology and has been serving as an editorial board member of BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. He co-authored chapters in the book Medicinal plant research in Africa: pharmacology and chemistry. Several postgraduate students have completed their studies under his supervision.

Abstract:

Sexually transmitted diseases have a major impact on sexual and reproductive health worldwide. Each year, the World Health Organization estimates 448 million new cases of curable STD’s are diagnosed. Ethanol extracts of twelve South African medicinal plants used in the treatment of STD’s and 3 flavonoids were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Oligella ureolytica. The anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts and compounds were determined by measuring the inhibitory effect of the extracts and compounds on the pro-inflammatory enzyme lipoxygenase. The extracts and compounds were also investigated for their anti-HIV activities against recombinant HIV-1 enzyme using non-radioactive HIV-RT colorimetric assay. Acacia karroo and Rhoicissus tridentata extracts showed good antimicrobial activity with MIC values ranging between 0.4 and 3.1 mg/ml. Extracts of Jasminum fluminense, Solanum tomentosum and flavonoids 2 and 3 had good anti-inflammatory activity with IC50 less than the positive control, quercetin (IC50 = 48.86 ug/ml). A. karroo and flavonoid 3 exhibited moderate HIV-1 RT inhibition activity of 66.8 and 63.7 % respectively. R. tridentata and Terminalia sericea had the best RT inhibition activity (75.7 and 100 %) compared to that of the positive control doxorubicin (96.5%) at 100 ug/ml concentration. The emergence of drug resistance in STD related microorganisms and potential side effects demand the discovery of newer drugs. The exploration of newer anti-microbial substances from natural sources may serve as promising alternatives. The observed activities may lead to new multi-target drugs against sexually transmitted diseases.

Wilfred T. Mabusela

University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Title: Phytochemical studies of selected African medicinal plants
Speaker
Biography:

Wilfred Mabusela completed his PhD at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and this was followed by two years of postdoctoral studies at the same institution, which extended his doctoral work on structural studies of plant polysaccharides. He subsequently took up a lecturing position at the University of the Western Cape where he is currently an associate professor. He has published more than 30 papers in reputable journals, and has been a visiting scientist at institutions in Europe and North America.

Abstract:

Traditional medicine is a cultural practice with a long history in Africa, and in South Africa it involves the use of approximately 3000 plants, out of a national biodiversity represented by about 30 000 higher plant species. For most of these, there is very little information about their phytochemical constituents, given that the therapeutic value of these plans is known to reside in their phytochemical composition. Furthermore, for most of these plants, some of which are on the open market, there are still no strict quality control reference data, which verifies the phytochemical profile of a particular plant sample. Hence the purpose of this study is broaden the knowledge on the phytochemical composition of medicinal plants, information which is expected to facilitate an understanding of their mode of action, in terms of therapy and toxicity. Methodology: Some medicinal plant species from South Africa and other African countries were collected.  Dried material samples were subjected to extraction using water as well as a variety of organic solvents followed by chromatographic fractionation of the extracts obtained. Isolated compounds were examined for their chemical structural features with the aid of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Some of the crude extracts and purified compounds were also studied for biological activity such as antioxidant activity, cytotoxicity (using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay), for antimicrobial activity against gram-negative and gram positive bacteria as well as fungal species, and enzyme inhibition properties. Findings:  Spectroscopic studies led to the identification of compounds belonging to the following classes: flavonoids and, terpenoid- and flavonoid- glycosides. Some extracts and isolated compounds displayed a broad spectrum of biological activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hsieh has complete the Chinese Medicine Doctor scholarship from China Medical University in Taiwan. He is serving as a Chief Resident Doctor of Chinese Medicine in Department of Chinese Medicine, Taipei Tzu Chi Hospital. He has intensively study in ShangHanLun and the Pulse Diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Abstract:

Introduction

Generally, western medicine treat patients with insomnia disorder in inhibiting or releasing way. But in the concept of Yin-Yang in Traditional Chinese Medicine(TCM), it’s not always effective to the Yang Deficiency patients, especially the Heart Yang Deficiency ones. We consider that being frightened could leads to Heart Yang Deficiency and Spirit-Restless Pattern in TCM.

Material and Methods

This case is a 64-year-old woman, suffered from domestic violence intermittently in 2015 and then divorced. After that, insomnia disorder, palpitation, empty feeling in chest, panic and anxiety was noted. Also, she dreamed about being hit accompanied with somniloquy and waving arms every night for about a year. There’s also weak pulse in cun position of both wrist pulse. Those symptoms and pulse findings are the same features as the Heart Yang Deficiency. Therefore, we treated her by warming Heart Yang and settling the Spirit formula (extract powder of Guizhi-Gancao-Longgu-Muli Decoction桂枝甘草龍骨牡蠣湯) 2.6gm four times a day since 2017/1/5.

Result

After the first week receiving the formula, there’s still dreamful sleep, but the palpitation partially relieved. After the second week, dream alleviated with only somniloquy left. Palpitation, empty feeling in chest and panic also relieved obviously. There was no significant side effect during or after the treatment.

Conclusion

We suggest that warm Heart Yang and settling the Spirit formula (Guizhi-Gancao-Longgu-Muli Decoction桂枝甘草龍骨牡蠣湯) is an effective and safe treatment for the Heart Yang Deficiency patients.

Nurul Qamariah

Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya, Indonesia

Title: ETHNOBOTANICAL STUDY OF QUR`AN PLANTS
Speaker
Biography:

Nurul Qamariah was born in Palangkaraya, Indonesia, in 1990. She received the B.E degree in Chemistry  Education from Palangkaraya University, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, in 2011, and the M.Sc degree in Pharmacy Herbal Medicine from University of Indonesia, Indonesia, in 2014. In 2014 She joined Faculty of Health Science, Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya, as a Lecturer. Since 2015, she became Head of planning and database division of Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya. Her current research interests include herbal medicine, natural product, and ethnobotanical.

 

Abstract:

In Islam, ethical teachings of biomedical ethics are linked with Holy Qur`an and Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). Qur`an is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God. The Quran is divided into chapters (surah in Arabic), which are then divided into verses (ayah). Qur`an mention a great number of wild plants that are still used in folk medicine. Qur`an  is one of the best reference books describing the importance of plants for medical benefits, where there are 28 Chapter (Surah) those mentioned specific name of plants in Al-Qur`an. This paper aims to compile the up-to-date information about some medicinal plants that mentioned in Al-Qur`an. Based on the collected data, there are 27 plant species mentioned in Al-Qur`an. In this paper, plants species were arranged in systematic order of identity of plant (The identity of the selected plants were confirmed from existing literature such as, books, journal article, and family and species of plants were confirmed from nomenclatural and bibliographic database), followed by Indonesian name, English name, Family, references cited from Holy Qur`an, part used, chemical constituents, and efficacy of herbal medicine that has been used both empirically and scientifically.

Speaker
Biography:

Dasril BASIR  has completed his Chemistry Bachelor at  Andalas University  in 1984 and Master in Organic Chemistry at The Institute of Technology Bandung, Indonesia  in 1986.  One year research  of Intership of Organic Synthesis at School of Chemistry, UNSW, Sydney, Australia in 1989. The Six Months Joint Research on RGD Peptidemimetics at Department of  Pharmaceutical Chemisry, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA in 1995 and Six Months Researc visit of Natural Products Chemistry and  Biologycal Activity  at Institut Fur Pharmazeutische Biologie,  Heinrich Heine  Universitat , Dusseldorf,  Germany in 2002. He has three sccopus published articles dealing with phytochemistry works on Fragraea fragrans fruits  and two DOAJ published articles.

Abstract:

Fragraea fragrans fruits are locally named buah tembesu, belongs to Loganiaceae family. Those can be harvested two time a year, in May and in November. The major secondary methabolites of the fruits are ursolic acid and its isomer oleanolic acids (3.1% accounted from the dried ones). In order to develop these fruits become topical herbal cosmetic products for skincare. The bioactive compounds of the fruits have been mapped to consider their side effects as well as their  efficacy. Eleven compounds have been successfully identified with LCMS/MS from the filtrates of the methanol extracts of the fruits after the solid crystals of ursolic acid and its isomer oleanolic acid  have completely precipitated[1,2], and their chemical structures were confirmed by comparing their molecular ion peaks to relevant compounds in some of references respectively; including the fragment ion peaks patterns.  As a result, those compounds were clasified into phenyl propanoic, pentacylic triterpene acids, flavones, phenyl propanoic, and tanin trimer groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Susy Tjahjani is a PhD.and works as a lecturer and a chairman of Tropical Disease Research, Medical Research Centre in Faculty of Medicine, Maranatha Christian University.

Abstract:

In order to overcome malarial resistance tendency against ACT (artemisinin based combination therapy), several galenic preparations of Garcinia mangostana L rind have been studied and they have antimalarial activity in vitro. One of the major xanthones in this rind may contribute to this activity. Curcumin as one of the major compound of Curcuma domestica, is also potentially to have antimalarial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimalarial activity of this xanthone, curcumin, and one derivate of artemisinins and also to evaluate their mechanism of action. Interaction between them each other as antimalarial in vitro was also studied. Antimalarial activity was studied in in vitro 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum cultivation incubated with these compounds to look for the IC50 and ∑FIC50 of them. The mechanism of action of these compounds was observed electron microscopically. The result of this promising study would be reported.  

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. V. Veena is currently working as Assistant Professor at School of Chemical and Biological Sciences, REVA University, Bangalore, India. Dr. Veena did her doctoral studies from Pondicherry University, India in 2016 and has 8 years of Research experiences and one year of teaching experience for post graduate and graduate students. Her area of Research includes small molecules of diverse origin for cancer therapy and nanophotosensitisers for photodynamic therapy. She is recipient of junior and senior research fellow from Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and University Grant Commission (UGC), Government of India. She was also awarded Research Project Assistant in UGC-SAP (special assistant program) by Department of Biotechnology, Pondicherry University, India. Her research contributions was published peer reviewed international journals and she is reviewer of some journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Several herbal and ayurvedic preparations are currently used to treat the cancer patients. Although, several herbs used in such treatment contains pharmacologically important molecules but they are yet to be identified and their mode of action is not studied in detail. Cancer is defined as a wound that never heals due to its complicated cellular organizations. Thus, the main objective of present investigation was to identify the herbal leads that target the inflammatory tumor environment through modern approaches.

The purpose of this study: India is the major country that is rich in the biodiverse compounds to treat disorders through herbal and ayurvedic approaches. Several natural lead molecules are being reported and continuously being investigated globally. The good examples are being curcumin and taxol derivatives of natural origin that is effective against cancer and inflammatory disorders. Identification of small molecule drugs from herbs by increasing the selectivity towards tumor is the prime importance of the study. In this context, we have investigated several diverse herbal lead molecules that aimed to increase the selectivity and inflammatory aspects of heterogenic cancer components.

Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: The major photochemical components of herbs used in treatment of various disorders was screened to identify an active components based on preliminary studies. Further, through virtual screening, the compounds were identified against cancer specific targets by computational approaches. The results were validation by in vitro interaction studies and cell-based approaches followed by in vivo toxicity studies.

Findings:The lead molecules were obtained that can be used for in vivo studies for development of anticancer drugs. The findings also enriched the knowledge regarding mechanistic approach of ayurvedic drugs being used.

Conclusion and Significance: The active herbal constituents that target the multiple pathways which are deregulated in cancer was very useful to for identification of some pharmacologically important lead backbone that cannot be obtained by cheminformatic approaches andfurther utilized for clinical trials. This study identified the synergistic components of leads and other vital components present in the herbs increased the selectively towards cancer. This study also enriched the knowledge regarding the mechanism of action of some Indian ayurvedic herbal preparations.