Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd Global Summit on Herbals & Traditional Medicine Osaka, Japan.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Indira Anand

British Association of Accredited Ayurvedic Practitioners UK

Keynote: Energy Healing through some Esoteric Yogic Practices
Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Indira Anand photo
Biography:

As the Chair of BAAAP, Indira  has been organising Ayurveda workshops and conferences in London for the past 10 years. She took up Ayurveda after early retirement from her main profession as an Investment Banker.  She was a Director of Merrill Lynch for over 10 years and finished her Investment Banking career in 1998. She holds a Masters and a Ph.D. in Economics and has published several professional papers and 6 books. Indira trained as a teacher of Yoga from Bihar School of Yoga, Munger, and has been teaching Yoga and conducting Yoga retreats for the past 20 years.

Abstract:

Energy vibrates in the body as a pranic flow and when the flow is increased by access to cosmic energy or by working directly on the dormant energy in the body it can be directed to the diseased parts of the body for healing.  The direction of energy is done in different ways in different systems of healing. But intentionality is an important ingredient. By combining intentionality with faith and belief, we also access the valuable assistance of the subconscious mind. My presentation will cover ‘Tattwa Shuddhi’ – purification of the subtler elements the body is composed of- for general self–healing and as a preparation for healing others; ‘Prana Vidya’ – an Art & Science of Healing Oneself and Others; ‘Prana Nidra’ – which aims at expanding the awareness and the experience of prana in previously unconscious areas. It is useful both as a physical and mental therapy and also for changing one’s perspectives and lifestyle; ‘Yoga Nidra’ -  the most effective way to relieve physical, emotional and mental tensions - the cause of most psycho-somatic diseases, which modern medical science is ill-equipped to tackle and finally, ‘Swar Yoga’ – which teaches us how using the right swara, by over-riding the natural rhythm of the breath through left or right nostril, one could help so many health conditions. The three swaras (through the left, right and both nostrils) correspond to the three major systems – Chitta, Prana and Atma -  which control gyanendriyas, krmendriyas and the whole being, respectively. All these require some experience of Yoga.

Keynote Forum

Janethy Balakrishnan Bokstrom

Institute of Integrated Regenerative Medicine Malaysia

Keynote: Ancient fats/oils to reverse metabolic disorders
Herbals Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Janethy Balakrishnan Bokstrom photo
Biography:

Dr. Janethy's impressive global and local achievements within a span of 27 years of her clinical career, speaks volumes about a Master Trainer who believes in empowering people, because health is a basic human right and is everyone's responsibility. Healthcare should not be just delivered but greatly encouraged by well informed self-care. She heads AIMM's thrust to integrate allopathic, non-allopathic and related medical professionals into one cohesive unit.

Abstract:

Fats were the cornerstones of our ancient diet. This is due to fats’ high nutrient density that is needed for brain development, general growth and reproduction.

Our early ancestors lived before the days of commercial food processing and before the addition of preservatives, coloring agents, synthetic flavoring, trans fats, GMOs, etc. Hence, their diets have been described as ‘simple, basic, pure and safe’.

Sadly, for more than six decades we’ve been misled to believe that saturated fat and cholesterol causes heart disease. It’s such a deeply ingrained belief that people neither challenged nor even dared questioned the science behind it.

Now, there is overwhelming support and mounting evidence that low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high saturated fat diet is the well-founded formula to prevent and treat metabolic diseases. There are more than 700 published articles including data to prove the health benefits of saturated fats.

It had been well elucidated that processed carbohydrates and excess dietary proteins are the root cause of mitochondrial dysfunction, chronic inflammation, glycation as well as fueling cancer cell growth.

A common observation in studies is that Insulin resistance causes the metabolic cascade of degenerative disorders. Insulin signaling, mTOR and autophagy control cellular mechanisms and signaling pathways regulating ageing. Dietary fat is the only source of energy that does not trigger insulin spikes which is one of the causes of insulin resistance.

We had conducted clinical studies on 670 patients with Palm kernel oil over the past year. PKB is 82% saturated fat, out of which 48% to 50 % is Lauric acid. In a nutshell, results are strongly positive and impressive with regards to clinical signs and symptoms in this revisited up-and -coming ancient fat.

  • Track:1 Herbal Medicine | Track:2 Traditional Medicine | Track:4 Alternative Medicine | Track:7 Pharmacognosy & Phytochemistry

Session Introduction

Christopher T. Arick

National University of Health Sciences, USA

Title: Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue: A Case Report
Speaker
Biography:

Christopher T. Arick, DC, MS is currently the Assistant Dean and Chief Acacdemic Officer of Chiropractic Medicine at the National University of Health Sciences. He has completed his Doctor of Chiropractic degree at National University of Health Sciences in 2005 and has earned a master’s degree in advanced clinical practice. Dr Arick has taught for the university for since 2012. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Higher Education Administration from the University of South Florida where his research topic is integrative medicine education.

Abstract:

The purpose of this case report was to describe the examination and management of a patient with chronic fatigue. A 34-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with complaints of fatigue and inability to lose weight for 2 years. When tested, she was found to have high serum thyroglobulin antibodies, low serum vitamin D3, low saliva dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, and low saliva total and diurnal cortisol. The patient was placed on an anti-inflammatory ancestral diet and given recommendations to decrease the aerobic intensity of her exercise routine. On the basis of the result of conventional and functional laboratory tests, she was prescribed a treatment plan of targeted supplementation. After 12 weeks of application of dietary, lifestyle, and supplementation recommendations, the patient reported experiencing increased energy and weight loss of 15 pounds. Her thyroglobulin antibodies returned within reference range, salivary cortisol increased and closely followed the proper circadian rhythm, and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate increased. This report describes improvement in a patient with chronic fatigue with the use of nonpharmaceutical polytherapy involving dietary changes, lifestyle modification, and supplementation.

Speaker
Biography:

Juan Ulloa has completed his Master degree at the age of 24 and PhD at the age of 29 years from Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia, SA. Actually, he is Professor of Microbiology and Virology and Director of the Laboratory of Virology in the same university. He has published papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. In 2016 he applied for a patent from the studies related with Achyrocline bogotensis as new antiviral.

Abstract:

Achyrocline bogotensis (Kunth) DC. (Compositae) is an endemic plant of Colombia, South America. This species has been traditionally used to treat mainly prostatitis and to clean the urinary tract. Rotaviruses and Astroviruses are enteropathogenic viruses which cause severe gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Diarrhea remains the second leading cause of death among children under five globally. Viruses are the major etiological agents and the most frequent enteropathogenic virus associated with AGE is rotavirus.

The viral diarrhea treatment focuses on fluid replacement with oral rehydration salts (ORS) to prevent dehydration and zinc treatment to decrease its severity and duration.  Currently, no specific antiviral drug is available to treat enteropathogenic viral infections.

Since 2011, our research group has been studied several aspects related with the antiviral activity of A. bogotensis. To date, we have studied: 1) The in vitro antiviral activity of separated substances and a phytoterapeutic product (PTP) developed for oral administration, 2) The sub-acute oral toxicity – limit test – and predictive toxicology of the PTP and 3) The phytochemical characterization of the antiviral fraction and the PTP. In summary our results have been consistent based on the singnificant anti-rotaviral activity with a low toxicity and we have identified the main compounds of the antiviral fraction.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Dina Tulina, MD, cPhD, MSocSc (UK), MSc Neuropsychiatry is Senior Medical Advisor at Stellar Biomolecular Research, speaker and specialist in anti-aging, aesthetics and regenerative medicine. After 15 years of medical and research experience in neuropsychiatry, Dr. Tulina turned her clinical practice and scientific interests to preventive medicine, natural and holistic age reversal therapies, and the usage of biologicals in regenerative medicine. Nowadays Dr. Tulina lectures widely as well as been published in many international academic journals. She is an active member of professional medical societies, associations and research projects, and a respected Senior Medical Advisor at European Wellness Academie, NexGen Biopharma and various APEC offices.

Abstract:

The evolution of complementary and alternative medicine leaded to the globally academically recognized level and became popular among health care consumers, practitioners, researchers and policy makers. Complementary and alternative medicine ranges widely from nutrition and supplements up to nanotechnology and cell therapy. The biggest part of alternative therapy consist of biological medicine which includes therapeutic goods and substances naturally derived from biological sources. Placenta and Marine Extract Supplements with fish cartilage extracts, collagen and elastin studied in Skin Test Institute, Neuchatel, Switzerland and showed improvement in mental symptoms, physical performance including cartilage reconstruction, skin anti-ageing and condition overall. Progress in Nanotechnology and molecular biology elevated research to a new advanced era as 10 kDa nano peptides able to penetrate through buccal mucosa and can administered sublingually. Nano Organo Peptides extracted from ovary tissue, thymus, testis, pancreas and other main organs help to repair and restore cellular structure and organs function and naturally stimulate hormones production. Next step of technology is scientifically proven combination of different sizes of peptides for enhanced and prolonged effect. Mito Organelle Formula combines 10 kDa nano size peptides with 45-65kDa. Natural regenerative effect was observed after second mesotherapy by MO aesthetical range. Longest effect belongs to concentrated biological extracts from spleen, adrenal gland, heart, liver, hypothalamus, placenta and other organs and tissues due to big size of molecules despite that effect achieved slower. Phyto peptides technology available in supplements for slimming and muscle building-Myopep, anti-inflammatory- Regenapep and sexual health - Enhacepep. PlaqX Forte with botanical ingredient from soya beans restores liver, decreases LDH, reduces high blood pressure, removes atherosclerotic plaques and improves memory. The regenerative properties of organic ingredients are already a present and future research will bring new opportunities for natural healing and anti-ageing.

Speaker
Biography:

Karin Kraft is qualified in internal medicine and naturopathy, and holds the chair of naturopathy at the University Medicine of Rostock, Germany since 2002. She has published more than 140 papers in reputed journals and is president of the German Society on Phytotherapy since 2010.

Abstract:

In Europe, herbal medicinal drugs (HMPs), and food, including food supplements, have different legal definitions (Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation 1924/2006, respectively). They therefore must be clearly separated. HMPs have pharmacological effects and are used for therapy, relief, prevention or diagnosis of diseases. They are subdivided into HMPs with the status well-established use (proven efficacy by at least one sufficient clinical study, proven quality and tolerability, and indications for mainly mild diseases), and HMPs with the status traditional use (proven quality and tolerability, and indications for minor health problems). On the contrary, foods and food supplements have physiological effects and are primarily used for nutrition or health-related effects by healthy consumers. There is no commitment to control for their quality and tolerability, and they are promoted by a health claim. In the EU, food supplements produced from plants and their preparations (“botanicals”) until now very often have unapproved health claims reminding of the indication of HMPs with traditional use status. However, consumers have to be informed correctly on the nutrition and health value of plants and their preparations contained in food and food supplements in order to be able to choose the appropriate product for their needs. Hence, all health claims should be based on relevant health-related effects that have been proven by adequate scientific evaluation.

Speaker
Biography:

Poet, Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist, Bihabwa worked as a psychiatrist for four years in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Among other things, he treated women who had been raped and their children, from rape. He was the coordinating doctor of the National Program of Mental Health in the province of South Kivu. He worked at the Fann hospital in Dakar for three years before going to France at the EPSM des Flandres.Psychiatrist, he specialized in Transcultural approach at the University Paris Descartes, in the program coordinated by Professor Marie-Rose Moro.His research explores the problem posed by traumatic events on social and societal dynamics. He works on the trauma and resilience of children from rape in a patrilineal patriarchal society. He is particularly interested in topics related to the transmission of trauma and Transgenerational trauma.In the treatment, he works on the complementary approach, which combines traditional and modern approaches.

Abstract:

Introduction

To have studied, worked and earned his salary constituted a transgression against the will of the deceased father. To be purified, a special course was necessary: healers-exorcists-hospital.
The individual experience of illness exhumed, in B, conflicts between transmissions, filiations and affiliations.
It is the relation to knowledge in a universe where it draws from two sources, made heterogeneous.

Results

M'B grew up in the royal court, emblematic symbol of the pure tradition. Graduated as nurse, he was hired by the Congolese organization of emergency management, Croix-Rouge du Congo. As head of an aid worker team, M Bami is led to deal with disasters, especially those produced by the exactions of armed groups given the current state of the security context in eastern DRC.

In the middle of a mission, to intervene in a slaughter in which was killed thirty-eight people, a psychic trauma was triggered in him.

Alongside the literary descriptions ―learned in school and used every day for his patients― the reading of his own suffering is traditional first. M Bami has managed to subtly carry his illness within an area where mix Western type treatment and traditional type. This disease was, in addition, an opportunity for rereading family ties, relationships between his ―very demanding― work and his father’s will. The king's witch doctor, the same who treated his father, provided the key, by his ritual to soothe family disputes. He also updated the meaning of symbols in order to establish individual and collective narrative identity, so that M B's work is no longer in conflict with his deceased father's will.

Conclusion

The value of this case lies in the reflection on modernity in the health system to provide mediation between two intentionally made heterogeneous universes: the theories of some against realities of living of others. Caregiver training, while remaining scientist would benefit from being closer to cultural practices to finally aspire to its note of nobility: become more Humans.

Speaker
Biography:

Daniela M. A. F. Navarro has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from University of São Paulo (USP) and postdoctoral studies from Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil)/IACR-Rothamsted, U.K.. She has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as referee of reputed journals.

Abstract:

Aedes aegypti is vector of Dengue and Yellow Fevers, a mosquito of public health importance. It is the most broadly disseminated urban species of mosquito in the world. Larval insecticide is one of the alternatives to control the mosquito dissemination. Temephos and Bacillus turinghiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) are the larvicidal most used in the world to combat A. aegypti mosquito. In face of larvae resistance to Temephos and the high cost of Bti production in large scale, research programs on insecticides often focus on alternative compounds and natural products as rich sources of larvicides. Repelletn and oviposition deterrent are used to reduce the contact between infected mosquito and urban population. In this work we describe significant larvicidal, repellent and oviposition deterrent activities research of essential oils against A. aegypti. Some larvicidal acitivity of plants and seweed will described.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Mohammad Kamil a Chartered Chemist and  Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry London   is Head TCAM Research Section, Zayed Complex for Herbal Research & Trad.Medicine, Regulation Division ,Health Authority –Abu Dhabi,UAE  .Recipient of Common Wealth Award-London; Convention Award of Chemical Society-India; Academic Exchange Fellowship from Association of Common Wealth Universities -London; and Global award on Unani Medicine and various other prestigious honors &  awards. Worked as in charge of Drug lab.MoH India, Professor at Jamia Hamdard University, Produced 6 Ph.Ds and 14 M.Phil. Students . More than 325 papers and abstracts in reputed journals and international conferences are at credit; chaired a no. of scientific sessions and presented invited talks as plenary and invited speaker at various International conferences / symposia.  Associated with publication of many books; Author of a book and five chapters in different books; Research work cited widely in books e.g. Advance in research, Chapman and Hall, London.

Abstract:

The challenges are innumerable and enormous, making the global herbal/botanical market unsafe. The talk seeks to enlighten physicians, pharmacists, consumers and stakeholders in botanical medicine on the need to establish quality parameters for collection, handling, processing, manufacturing and production of safe botanicals as well as employ such parameters in ensuring the safety of the global botanical market which is directly linked to the safety of public health.

In the recent years with ever growing commercialization in the field of herbal medicines, there has been an instant demand for quality control of the drugs used in this system. The studies on the identity, purity and quality of the genuine drug will enhance information in checking the adulteration. A set of standards would not doubt be detterent on substitution and adulteration and also an aid for ‘Drug law Enforcement’.

In the present paper an attempt has been made for a sequential  study of the Quality Control of Herbal Medicinal Products ( HMP ) starting from Selection of Medicinal Plants ;Good Agricultural Practices (GAP ) Cultivation ;Good Field Collection Practices(GFCP) ; Organized and Unorganized Drugs ;Source and Period of Collection; Identification; Storage  ; Chemical Standardisation ; Assay ; Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Pharmacological studies to Clinical Approach , with special reference to maintain Standardisation at each and every stage.Adulteration of  unlabled ingredients/hidden ingrediets will be discussed with practical laboratory  experience.

Speaker
Biography:

Xin Zhou has completed her PhD at the age of 42 years from West China school of pharmacy, sichuan university. She is the director of Guizhou Engineering Laboratory for Quality Control & Evaluation Technology of Medicine, a premier herbal medicine quality control service organization. She has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

A sensitive, reliable and accurate HPLC-MS-MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of Gallic Acid (GA) and Protocatechuic Acid (PCA) in rat plasma, tissue and excretion. A single-step protein precipitation by acidic acetonitrile was used to prepare samples. GA, PCA and bergenin (internal standard, IS) were separated by using a C18 column and a mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid running at a flow rate of 0.2 ml/min for 10 min. Detection and quantification were performed using a mass spectrometer by the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive electrospray ionization mode. The optimized mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantitation were [M+H] 169.181 →125.268 (GA)、152.918 → 109.244 (PCA) and 326.922 → 192.167 (IS) , respectively. After oral administration of 0.36, 1.08 and 2.16 g·kg-1 of Polygonum capitatum extract, respective values of pharmacokinetic parameters for GA and PCA were: t1/2 1128.52/42.81、93.72/90.15and 114.70/49.80min; Cmax 245.98/11.90, 477.20/24.66, and 805.76/31.04 ng·ml-1. Linear pharmacokinetics was established based on high correlation coefficients (γ > 0.90) of pharmacokinetic parameters. The results of tissue distribution showed that GA mainly distributed in kidney, lung, and liver, while PCA mainly distributed in kidnry and lung. Less than 23.08% and 19.39% prototype of GA and PCA , respectively, were excreted from urine and feces path indicating that GA and PCA are extensively metabolized in rat.

Speaker
Biography:

Younghee Yun has completed her PhD from college of Traditional Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea. From 2007 to June, 2017, she had worked as a clinical assistant professor of allergic/derma clinic of the Kyunghee University Korean medicine hospital at gangdong, conducted clinical studies in allergic skin diseases, and has published more than 12 papers. She is the CEO of CY Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., a herbal medicine manufacturing and development company. Her main interest is atopic dermatitis, allergic skin disease and pharmacological action of herbal medicine.

Abstract:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common pruritic inflammatory skin disease. In its chronic stage, hyperpigmentation, excoriation, lichenification, and dryness are the main symptoms. Jaungo comprises two herbs, Lithospermi radix and Angelica gigantis radix, and three carrier oils, and is an approved herbal ointment for xerosis in Korea. In past preclinical studies, we demonstrated that Jaungo had anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic activity. We conducted a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, single-centre trial with three parallel arms. Trial group 1 applies Jaungo twice a day, while trial group 2 applies Jaungo and the placebo once a day, separately, and the placebo group applies the placebo twice a day, for a total of 3 weeks each. Participants evaluated for eczema based on the Eczema Area and Severity score, the SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis Score, the Dermatology Life Quality score, transepidermal water loss, total IgE level, eosinophil count, and IL-17, IL-22, and IFN-γ levels. The outcomes to evaluate the safety included Draize score and blood test. In total, 28 patients (82.4%) completed the study. Significant decline of EASI scores in trial group 2 and placebo group was observed (p<0.05). There was significant decline of SCORAD scores in trial group 1 and placebo group (p<0.05). However, Patients in all groups showed decreased TEWL and DLQI scores with no significant difference. No clinically relevant changes in laboratory values were observed except IL-17. There was significant decline of IL-17 in all groups (p<0.05). Inter-group analysis showed no significant difference. No serious adverse event was observed.

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled Abo-EL-Sooud is a Prof of Pharmacology, Faculty of Vet. Med. Cairo University. He supervised several Master and Ph.D. theses in Egypt and Arabian Countries. He is expertise in Radioisotopes and Chromatography (GC-HPLC-TLC etc.) for detection of drug residues. He is publishing about 66 international papers. Nowadays, the research is shifted to nanotechnology and phytomedicine. Member of Ministry of Health and promotion committee of Supreme Council of Universities committee.

Abstract:

Central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs have many negative side effects including addiction, depression, suicide, convulsion, sexual dysfunction, headaches and more. Moreover, these agents do not restore normal levels of neurotransmitters but instead influence the brain chemistry. In contrast to drugs, a number ethno-botanical products have been identified which reduce anxiety by re-establishing by altering both neurotransmitter levels in the absence of the severe side effects. The bitter orange fruit (Citrus aurantium) contains a number of phytochemicals of interest known to increase the production of dopamine. The purpose of this study is to evaluate Citrus aurantium L. oil ability to induce sedative/hypnotic and/or general anaesthetic effects in experimental models. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Essential oil from peel was obtained by steam distillation, then maintained and protected against light and heat until the pharmacological assays. The main component of the oil was determined by GC-MS. The LD50 of the oil was determined to calculate the therapeutic dose. Experimental models were performed in this study to evaluate the hypnotic and anesthetic effects of C. aurantium as compared with thiopental sodium at a dose of (30 mg kg-1) after intraperitoneal injection (I/P). Findings: The LD50 of the oil was 300 mg kg-1 of body weight after intraperitoneal injection (I/P). The main component of the EOP was d-limonene. The CNS depressant effect of C. aurantium oil is dose dependent. At small dose there was an induction of hypnosis as righting reflex was absent with ataxia. At higher doses the oil induced anesthesia at 8 min and the consciousness is regained in about 25 minutes. Conclusion & Significance: The use of animal model of hypnotic and ultra-short general anaesthetic of C. aurantium oil significantly supports its use an adjunct for the treatment of insomnia and other CNS disorders. Recommendations: Further evaluations are required to elucidate the detailed mechanism of CNS depressant activity and possible side effects of Citrus aurantium and the possibility of its use as alternative natural general anesthetic agent.

Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon

Abstract:

Microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II), and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1) are proteins that can be used as markers for autophagic pathway. Bcl-2 is a protein that is reported to be inversely correlated with apoptosis. We aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin on liver inflammation and fibrosis up to the first dysplastic stage of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) induced by Thioacetamide (TAA) in rats and clarified the effects of curcumin on LC3-II, SQSTM1, and Bcl-2.

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups: Control group and 3 groups received TAA 200 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly for 18 weeks: TAA group, Curcumin low-dose group, Curcumin high-dose group. Oxidative stress markers as hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by colorimetric methods. Hepatic SQSTM1 concentration was measured by ELISA, and gene expression levels of Bcl-2, and LC3-II was measured by RT-PCR. We also investigated the In vitro effect of curcumin on HepG2 cells viability through MTT assay, and the involvement of autophagy in this effect.

Curcumin increased the survival percent in rats, decreased α-fetoprotein (AFP) concentration, and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, and increased serum albumin concentration. Curcumin also caused a significant reduction in oxidative stress in liver, inhibited apoptosis, and induced autophagy. In vitro, It was found that curcumin decreased HepG2 cells viability and the concentration of SQSTM1.

In conclusion, curcumin leads to protection against TAA induced HCC through activating autophagic pathway and inhibiting apoptosis. Also, The antioxidant activity of curcumin almost prevents liver fibrosis.

Speaker
Biography:

Kusuma Sriyakul   completed her PhD (Thai traditional and Alternative Medicine) in 2012 at  Chulalongkorn University Thailand. She is the lecturer at Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University Thailand. She has published several papers about herbal medicine in dysmenorrheal, Thai traditional formula.

Abstract:

Yanang Daeng (Bauhinia strychnifolia Craib.) was used for a treatment of poisoning, elimination of pesticides, an effect of poisonous mushrooms, poisoning, breast  milk stimulation in women after delivery and reduce fatigue, the study aimed to gather the knowledge and experience from the folk healers about the usage of Yanang Daeng. This study was conducted using in-depth interview and group discussions from folk healers in four sectors throughout Thailand. The results showed those 59 folk healers from 4 sectors which consisted of 67.80% male and 32.20% female. Furthermore, the age of the participants was studied and the results showed that they aged ranged among 61-80, 41-60, 20-40 and more than 81 years old which respectively accounted for 49.15%, 30.51%, 13.56% and 6.78%. For the treatment of patients who receive the toxins, some folk healers will grind the root with water or water from washing rice, then the patient will be immediately received a single dose portion of 2 tablespoons, but the others will boil the leave and stems and give the patient a single dose portion range from ½ to 1 glass. In emergency case, they will use 10 fresh leaves, then squeeze with water or water from washing rice, and immediately give to patient as a potion. Moreover, the folk healers recommended to the villager that they should use leaves rather than using vine or root to prevent the extinction and also suggested them to plant for convenient use. Yanang Daeng is potent in solving the urgent poisoning problem in the community before receiving further treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Parunkul  Tunsukruthai completed her PhD (medical  sciences) in 2007 at Thammasat University Thailand. She is the lecturer at Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University Thailand. She has published several papers about herbal medicine, puerperium care, Thai massage to relief shoulder pain, and Acute and sub-chronic toxicity study Thai traditional formula.

Abstract:

Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a nasal mucosa inflammatory disorder that induced by an allergen exposure resulting in four symptoms including rhinorrhoea, sneezing, nasal itching and nasal congestion. Allergic rhinitis may results in sleep disturbance, fatigue, and quality of life impairment. The objective to examine the efficacy and safety in reducing allergic rhinitis of herbal steam bath compared to the steam bath, and to investigate the quality of life improvement and satisfaction in allergic rhinitis patients. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted on sixty four subjects who equally allocated into two groups. The treatment group was received herbal steam bath, and the control group was received steam bath without herbs for 30 minutes 3 times a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Allergic rhinitis symptoms were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) including itchy nose, runny nose, sneezing, nasal congestion and watery eyes at week 0,1,2,3 and week 4. Quality of life was assessed at week 0 and week 4 fond that the characteristics (sex, age, status, education, allergic rhinitis symptoms and frequency of symptoms) at the baseline were shown to be non-statistically significant. In addition, rhinorrhoea, sneezing, nasal itching and nasal congestion symptoms statistically reduced (p value<0.05), but non-significance when compared between treatment and control group. The treatment group was also shown to be significantly satisfied when compared to control group (p<0.05). Both herbal steam bath and normal steam bath had effectiveness in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis, and were safe to be used as an alternative treatment for allergic rhinitis.

Speaker
Biography:

Jurairat Boonruab earned her Ph.D. from Chulalongkorn University, Thailand in 2015. She is currently Deputy Head of the Academic Affairs Department and a lecturer at the Faculty of Medicine of Thammasat University, Thailand. Her areas of specialization include applied Thai traditional medicine, alternative medicine, and public health science. She has published Thai massage and Heber medicine.

Abstract:

Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is one of the most prevalent illnesses among those in the working age group caused by poor ergonomics, especially remaining in a sitting posture for an extended period of time. One alternative treatment for MPS is the application of a hot herbal compress, which helps to improve the quality of life of patients and reduce the undesirable side effects of pain relief medication. A controlled trial was conducted in which 90 participants were randomized into the hot herbal compress group (n=30), the hot compress group (n=30), and the topical diclofenac group (n=30). The first two groups received a 20-minute hot herbal compress and hot compress treatment not exceeding the temperature of 40 °C once a week for two weeks, whereas the last was administered 2 mg of a topical diclofenac gel three times a day for two weeks. Before and after the treatment, their level of pain intensity and quality of life was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. Additionally, their cervical range of motion (CROM) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were also evaluated. It was found that all the three groups experienced a statistically significant decrease in the level of pain intensity (p<0.05), a statistically significant increase in CROM (p<0.05), a statistically significant increase in PPT (p<0.05), and a statistically significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.05). However, for the last two assessment criteria, the results for the hot herbal compress group and the hot compress group were not only relatively equal but also better than those for the topical diclofenac group.

Nurul Qamariah

Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya, Indonesia

Title: ETHNOBOTANICAL STUDY OF QUR`AN PLANTS
Speaker
Biography:

Nurul Qamariah was born in Palangkaraya, Indonesia, in 1990. She received the B.E degree in Chemistry  Education from Palangkaraya University, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, in 2011, and the M.Sc degree in Pharmacy Herbal Medicine from University of Indonesia, Indonesia, in 2014. In 2014 She joined Faculty of Health Science, Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya, as a Lecturer. Since 2015, she became Head of planning and database division of Muhammadiyah University of Palangkaraya. Her current research interests include herbal medicine, natural product, and ethnobotanical.

 

Abstract:

In Islam, ethical teachings of biomedical ethics are linked with Holy Qur`an and Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). Qur`an is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God. The Quran is divided into chapters (surah in Arabic), which are then divided into verses (ayah). Qur`an mention a great number of wild plants that are still used in folk medicine. Qur`an  is one of the best reference books describing the importance of plants for medical benefits, where there are 28 Chapter (Surah) those mentioned specific name of plants in Al-Qur`an. This paper aims to compile the up-to-date information about some medicinal plants that mentioned in Al-Qur`an. Based on the collected data, there are 27 plant species mentioned in Al-Qur`an. In this paper, plants species were arranged in systematic order of identity of plant (The identity of the selected plants were confirmed from existing literature such as, books, journal article, and family and species of plants were confirmed from nomenclatural and bibliographic database), followed by Indonesian name, English name, Family, references cited from Holy Qur`an, part used, chemical constituents, and efficacy of herbal medicine that has been used both empirically and scientifically.

Speaker
Biography:

Dasril BASIR  has completed his Chemistry Bachelor at  Andalas University  in 1984 and Master in Organic Chemistry at The Institute of Technology Bandung, Indonesia  in 1986.  One year research  of Intership of Organic Synthesis at School of Chemistry, UNSW, Sydney, Australia in 1989. The Six Months Joint Research on RGD Peptidemimetics at Department of  Pharmaceutical Chemisry, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA in 1995 and Six Months Researc visit of Natural Products Chemistry and  Biologycal Activity  at Institut Fur Pharmazeutische Biologie,  Heinrich Heine  Universitat , Dusseldorf,  Germany in 2002. He has three sccopus published articles dealing with phytochemistry works on Fragraea fragrans fruits  and two DOAJ published articles.

Abstract:

Fragraea fragrans fruits are locally named buah tembesu, belongs to Loganiaceae family. Those can be harvested two time a year, in May and in November. The major secondary methabolites of the fruits are ursolic acid and its isomer oleanolic acids (3.1% accounted from the dried ones). In order to develop these fruits become topical herbal cosmetic products for skincare. The bioactive compounds of the fruits have been mapped to consider their side effects as well as their  efficacy. Eleven compounds have been successfully identified with LCMS/MS from the filtrates of the methanol extracts of the fruits after the solid crystals of ursolic acid and its isomer oleanolic acid  have completely precipitated[1,2], and their chemical structures were confirmed by comparing their molecular ion peaks to relevant compounds in some of references respectively; including the fragment ion peaks patterns.  As a result, those compounds were clasified into phenyl propanoic, pentacylic triterpene acids, flavones, phenyl propanoic, and tanin trimer groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Susy Tjahjani is a PhD.and works as a lecturer and a chairman of Tropical Disease Research, Medical Research Centre in Faculty of Medicine, Maranatha Christian University.

Abstract:

In order to overcome malarial resistance tendency against ACT (artemisinin based combination therapy), several galenic preparations of Garcinia mangostana L rind have been studied and they have antimalarial activity in vitro. One of the major xanthones in this rind may contribute to this activity. Curcumin as one of the major compound of Curcuma domestica, is also potentially to have antimalarial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimalarial activity of this xanthone, curcumin, and one derivate of artemisinins and also to evaluate their mechanism of action. Interaction between them each other as antimalarial in vitro was also studied. Antimalarial activity was studied in in vitro 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum cultivation incubated with these compounds to look for the IC50 and ∑FIC50 of them. The mechanism of action of these compounds was observed electron microscopically. The result of this promising study would be reported.  

Wilfred T. Mabusela

University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Title: Phytochemical studies of selected African medicinal plants
Speaker
Biography:

Wilfred Mabusela completed his PhD at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and this was followed by two years of postdoctoral studies at the same institution, which extended his doctoral work on structural studies of plant polysaccharides. He subsequently took up a lecturing position at the University of the Western Cape where he is currently an associate professor. He has published more than 30 papers in reputable journals, and has been a visiting scientist at institutions in Europe and North America.

Abstract:

Traditional medicine is a cultural practice with a long history in Africa, and in South Africa it involves the use of approximately 3000 plants, out of a national biodiversity represented by about 30 000 higher plant species. For most of these, there is very little information about their phytochemical constituents, given that the therapeutic value of these plans is known to reside in their phytochemical composition. Furthermore, for most of these plants, some of which are on the open market, there are still no strict quality control reference data, which verifies the phytochemical profile of a particular plant sample. Hence the purpose of this study is broaden the knowledge on the phytochemical composition of medicinal plants, information which is expected to facilitate an understanding of their mode of action, in terms of therapy and toxicity. Methodology: Some medicinal plant species from South Africa and other African countries were collected.  Dried material samples were subjected to extraction using water as well as a variety of organic solvents followed by chromatographic fractionation of the extracts obtained. Isolated compounds were examined for their chemical structural features with the aid of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Some of the crude extracts and purified compounds were also studied for biological activity such as antioxidant activity, cytotoxicity (using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay), for antimicrobial activity against gram-negative and gram positive bacteria as well as fungal species, and enzyme inhibition properties. Findings:  Spectroscopic studies led to the identification of compounds belonging to the following classes: flavonoids and, terpenoid- and flavonoid- glycosides. Some extracts and isolated compounds displayed a broad spectrum of biological activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Tshikalange is a senior Lecturer in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences of the University of Pretoria, South Africa. His research focus areas include ethno-botanical medicinal plants used traditionally in the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, oral pathogens and antimicrobial activities. He has published articles in peer reviewed national and international journals, such as the South African Journal of Botany and Journal of Ethnopharmacology and has been serving as an editorial board member of BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. He co-authored chapters in the book Medicinal plant research in Africa: pharmacology and chemistry. Several postgraduate students have completed their studies under his supervision.

Abstract:

Sexually transmitted diseases have a major impact on sexual and reproductive health worldwide. Each year, the World Health Organization estimates 448 million new cases of curable STD’s are diagnosed. Ethanol extracts of twelve South African medicinal plants used in the treatment of STD’s and 3 flavonoids were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Oligella ureolytica. The anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts and compounds were determined by measuring the inhibitory effect of the extracts and compounds on the pro-inflammatory enzyme lipoxygenase. The extracts and compounds were also investigated for their anti-HIV activities against recombinant HIV-1 enzyme using non-radioactive HIV-RT colorimetric assay. Acacia karroo and Rhoicissus tridentata extracts showed good antimicrobial activity with MIC values ranging between 0.4 and 3.1 mg/ml. Extracts of Jasminum fluminense, Solanum tomentosum and flavonoids 2 and 3 had good anti-inflammatory activity with IC50 less than the positive control, quercetin (IC50 = 48.86 ug/ml). A. karroo and flavonoid 3 exhibited moderate HIV-1 RT inhibition activity of 66.8 and 63.7 % respectively. R. tridentata and Terminalia sericea had the best RT inhibition activity (75.7 and 100 %) compared to that of the positive control doxorubicin (96.5%) at 100 ug/ml concentration. The emergence of drug resistance in STD related microorganisms and potential side effects demand the discovery of newer drugs. The exploration of newer anti-microbial substances from natural sources may serve as promising alternatives. The observed activities may lead to new multi-target drugs against sexually transmitted diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. V. Veena is currently working as Assistant Professor at School of Chemical and Biological Sciences, REVA University, Bangalore, India. Dr. Veena did her doctoral studies from Pondicherry University, India in 2016 and has 8 years of Research experiences and one year of teaching experience for post graduate and graduate students. Her area of Research includes small molecules of diverse origin for cancer therapy and nanophotosensitisers for photodynamic therapy. She is recipient of junior and senior research fellow from Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and University Grant Commission (UGC), Government of India. She was also awarded Research Project Assistant in UGC-SAP (special assistant program) by Department of Biotechnology, Pondicherry University, India. Her research contributions was published peer reviewed international journals and she is reviewer of some journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Several herbal and ayurvedic preparations are currently used to treat the cancer patients. Although, several herbs used in such treatment contains pharmacologically important molecules but they are yet to be identified and their mode of action is not studied in detail. Cancer is defined as a wound that never heals due to its complicated cellular organizations. Thus, the main objective of present investigation was to identify the herbal leads that target the inflammatory tumor environment through modern approaches.

The purpose of this study: India is the major country that is rich in the biodiverse compounds to treat disorders through herbal and ayurvedic approaches. Several natural lead molecules are being reported and continuously being investigated globally. The good examples are being curcumin and taxol derivatives of natural origin that is effective against cancer and inflammatory disorders. Identification of small molecule drugs from herbs by increasing the selectivity towards tumor is the prime importance of the study. In this context, we have investigated several diverse herbal lead molecules that aimed to increase the selectivity and inflammatory aspects of heterogenic cancer components.

Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: The major photochemical components of herbs used in treatment of various disorders was screened to identify an active components based on preliminary studies. Further, through virtual screening, the compounds were identified against cancer specific targets by computational approaches. The results were validation by in vitro interaction studies and cell-based approaches followed by in vivo toxicity studies.

Findings:The lead molecules were obtained that can be used for in vivo studies for development of anticancer drugs. The findings also enriched the knowledge regarding mechanistic approach of ayurvedic drugs being used.

Conclusion and Significance: The active herbal constituents that target the multiple pathways which are deregulated in cancer was very useful to for identification of some pharmacologically important lead backbone that cannot be obtained by cheminformatic approaches andfurther utilized for clinical trials. This study identified the synergistic components of leads and other vital components present in the herbs increased the selectively towards cancer. This study also enriched the knowledge regarding the mechanism of action of some Indian ayurvedic herbal preparations.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Varun Vikas Vij has done M pharmacy in Pharmacology and pursuing PhD from Baba Farid University of Health Sciences Faridkot Punjab India and currently working as a Pharmacy Executive in Dayanand Medical College and Hospital Ludhiana Punjab India. Mr. Vij has 11 years of experience in pharmaceutical industry (9 years in Pharmaceutical marketing and 2 years in Hospital pharmacy). He has 2 International publications. He has keen interest in Neuro Pharmacology.

Abstract:

Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve injury is a clinical disorder characterized by a combination of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and tactile pain (allodynia), and remains a significant clinical problem since it is often poorly relieved by conventional analgesics. Despite the progress that has occurred in recent years in the development of therapy, there is still a need for effective and potent analgesics for neuropathic pain. This review summarizes the existing studies investigated the efficacy of herbs as a treatment for neuropathic pain. Recently discovered analgesic substances in neuropathic pain include alkaloids, terpenoids and flavonoid, this plant-derived substances have, and will certainly continue to have, a relevant place in the process of drug discovery, particularly in the development of new analgesic drugs. In this review, emphasis will be given to the important contribution of herbs and their compounds in the development of new analgesics.

Speaker
Biography:

Faezeh Dadras has her experience in relationship between traditional medicine and architecture. She has worked on effects of temperament as traditional medicine grouping for human on their tendency to different environment factors. She has reached to this relationship after several experiments on human temperament and their trend to various environment factors like (color, light, material, temperature, etc.) in traditional medicine clinics. According to quick change of time and stability of propensities and general mental and physical needs of human, it is necessary for environment designers to become familiar with temperamental principles that include physical and spiritual conditions of users of spaces.

Abstract:

People with various mental and physical features show different favorites to colors. The relationship between individual features of humans and their propensities to circumstantiality of color have been evaluated in psychological discussions. According to generality of concept of temperament and covering physical and mental features of people, it seems that a significant relationship can be obtained between temperamental difference of people and their propensities to circumstantiality of color. Temperaments of 100 visitors to traditional medicine clinic at Tehran University were identified by method of doctor checkup and temperament-assessment questionnaire. Their propensities to three components of coldness and warmth of colors, light and darkness of color and contrast or uniformity in the arrangement of colors next to each other in both fields of colors selection and spaces selection with different tonality were obtained by questionnaire of assessment of temperament. Totally 100 responders with age average of 27 years old with gender of 42% male and 57% female completed the questionnaire. Wet temperaments have more propensity to light colors and also spaces with light tonality than the dry temperaments. Warm temperaments have more interest to warm colors than the cold temperaments but they prefer spaces with cold tonality. There was no significant relationship between temperamental groups and propensity to spaces with arrangement of harmonious or opposite colors beside each other. There is a significant relationship between temperamental differences of people and their propensity to circumstantiality of color. Wetness or dryness of temperament is effective on circumstantiality of lightness and darkness of color and warmth and coldness of temperament is effective on propensity to warmth and coldness of the color. Attention to temperamental propensities of people in propensity to colors can improve quality of human made physical environment and create human-based and health center space.

Speaker
Biography:

Sarat completed B.Sc. from Silver Jublee Government College, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh; M.Sc. from Bangaluru University and was awarded Ph.D. from Kuvempu University, Karnataka. Received post doctoral training from NINDS/NIH, USA and Univ. of Regensburg, Germany. His laboratory in Nagaland University focuses on Drosophila approaches to understand Parkinson's disease associated neurodegeneration.

Abstract:

Curcumin has been used for centuries in traditional medicines in India and other parts of Asia and has been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral and antibacterial activities as indicated by over 8000 citations. In addition, over one hundred clinical studies have been carried out with curcumin. Genotropic drugs would be effective only during those life cycle stages during which their target molecules are available. Hence there exists a possibility that targets of genotropic compounds such as curcumin may not be present in all life stages. However no reports are available in PD models illustrating efficacy of curcumin in later phases of adult life which is important as this is the period when late onset disorder such as idiopathic PD set in. To understand this paradigm tested the protective efficacy of curcumin in different growth stages (early, late health stage and transition phase) in adult Drosophila flies and results showed that it can rescue the motor defects during early stages of life but ineffective at later phases. This observation was substantiated with the finding that curcumin treatment could replenish depleted brain dopamine levels in PD model only during early stages of life cycle, clearly suggesting limitation of curcumin as a therapeutic agent in late onset neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). To decipher therapeutic targets we looked into the transcriptome using illumina® platform. Our recent insights about the putative pathways involved in the stage specific efficacy of curcumin will be discussed.